Bright Dyes Rhodamine WT Dye

The Bright Dyes Fluorescent FWT red dye is ideal for septic inspection applications.

Features

  • Preferred, high strength formulations for medium to large scale visual and fluoremetric studies
  • NSF Standard 60 Certification for use in or around potable water sources
  • Also used to calibrate YSI 6025, 6130, 6131 & 6132 optical sensors
Starting At $29.95
Stock 8AVAILABLE
Bright Dyes act as a coloring label on each drop of water. As that water or liquid travels, it can be identified at each point on its travel, until it reaches extreme dilution. It may be detected visually, by ultraviolet light and by appropriate fluorometric equipment.

The dyes selectively absorb light in the visible range of the spectrum. They are fluorescent because, upon absorbing light, they instantly emit light at a longer wave length than the light absorbed. This emitted (fluorescent) light goes out in all directions. Most common fluorescent tracers are compounds which absorb green light and emit red fluorescent light.

FWT red dye is resistant to absorption on most suspended matter in fresh and salt water. Compared to Bright Dyes FLT Yellow/Green products, FWT Red is significantly more resistant to degradation by sunlight and when used in fluorometry, stands out much more clearly against background fluorescence.
Questions & Answers
How do I dilute this dye for a 125 mg/L rhodamine standard?

Using this dye, various dilutions can be performed to get to industry standard solutions following the instructions on page 129 of the YSI EXO Manual. www.fondriest.com/pdf/ysi_exo_manual.pdf 

Please, mind that only logged in users can submit questions

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Description
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Bright Dyes Rhodamine WT Dye
106023-01P
FWT 25 Rhodamine WT dye, 2.5% active ingredient, 1 pint
$29.95
8 Available
Bright Dyes Fluorescent Red FWT 25 Dye
106023-01G
FWT 25 Rhodamine WT dye, 2.5% active ingredient, 1 gallon
$129.95
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Bright Dyes Rhodamine WT Dye
106053-01P
FWT 50 Rhodamine WT dye, 5% active ingredient, 1 pint
$59.95
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Bright Dyes Fluorescent Red FWT 50 Dye
106053-01G
FWT 50 Rhodamine WT dye, 5% active ingredient, 1 gallon
$249.95
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Bright Dyes Rhodamine WT Dye
106203-01P
FWT 200 Rhodamine WT dye, 20% active ingredient, 1 pint
$229.95
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Bright Dyes Fluorescent Red FWT 200 Dye
106203-01G
FWT 200 Rhodamine WT dye, 20% active ingredient, 1 gallon
$949.95
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