Fondriest Environmental pH 4 Calibration Buffers

Fondriest Environmental offers a full line of pH 4 calibration buffers in pint, quart, 1-gallon,and 5-gallon containers.

Features

  • +/-1% accuracy with NIST traceability
  • Pre-mixed and ready to use
  • Temperature compensation scale
Starting At $13.03
Stock 6AVAILABLE
Questions & Answers
No Questions
Please, mind that only logged in users can submit questions

Select Options

  Products 0 Item Selected
Image
Part #
Description
Price
Stock
Quantity
Fondriest Environmental pH 4 Calibration Buffer
FNBU5004-P
pH 4 calibration buffer, 500mL bottle
$13.03
6 Available
Fondriest Environmental pH 4 Calibration Buffers
FNBU5004-Q
pH 4 calibration buffer, 1L bottle
$19.86
Check Availability  
Fondriest Environmental pH 4 Calibration Buffers
FNBU5004-G
pH 4 calibration buffer, 4L bottle
$46.21
Check Availability  
Fondriest Environmental pH 4 Calibration Buffers
FNBU5004-F
pH 4 calibration buffer, 4L cubitainer
$50.63
Check Availability  
Fondriest Environmental pH 4 Calibration Buffers
FNBU5004-10L
pH 4 calibration buffer, 10L cubitainer
$61.33
Check Availability  
Fondriest Environmental pH 4 Calibration Buffers
FNBU5004-T
pH 4 calibration buffer, 20L cubitainer
$111.35
Check Availability  
Fondriest Environmental pH 4 Calibration Buffers
FNBU5004-BP
pH 4 calibration buffer, 20mL pouches, pack of 20
$40.70
Check Availability  
Notice: At least 1 product is not available to purchase online
×
Multiple Products

have been added to your cart

There are items in your cart.

Cart Subtotal: $xxx.xx

Go to Checkout

In The News

Ocean acidification: University of Washington's giant plastic bags help control research conditions

With oceans becoming more acidic worldwide, scientists are getting creative in designing experiments to study them. For example, one group at the University of Washington is using giant plastic bags to study ocean acidification. Each bag holds about 3,000 liters of seawater and sits in a cylinder-like cage for stability. The group at UW, made up of professors and students, is controlling carbon dioxide levels in the bags over a nearly three-week period, during which they are looking at the effects of increased acidity on organisms living near the San Juan Islands. “These mesocosms are a way to do a traditional experiment you might do in a lab or classroom,” said Jim Murray, professor of oceanography at the University of Washington.

Read More

Caring for the Chesapeake: Supporting the Iconic Bay Starts with Good Monitoring Data

The Chesapeake Bay is enormous: the Bay and its tidal tributaries have 11,684 miles of shoreline—more than the entire U.S. west coast. It is the largest of more than 100 estuaries in the United States and the third largest in the world. The Bay itself is about 200 miles long, stretching from Havre de Grace, Maryland, to Virginia Beach, Virginia. But the Chesapeake Bay isn’t just enormous--it’s enormously important. The  Chesapeake Bay Program  reports that its watershed covers about 64,000 square miles and is home to more than 18 million people, 10 million of which live along or near the Bay’s shores.

Read More

Treating Harmful Algal Blooms: A Natural Progression

Some of us happen upon the subject of our life’s work by accident, some of us are born into it, and some of us ease into it over time. For Tom Johengen, Research Scientist for Cooperative Institute for Great Lakes Research (CIGLR) and Director of Michigan Sea Grant , choosing to study Harmful Algal Blooms (HAB) was “a natural progression” from his days as a grad student investigating best management practices for controlling nonpoint source nutrient pollution. “I’ve been the research scientist with CIGLR since my postdoc in 1991, 31 years, and I’ve been the Director of Michigan Sea Grant for the past 3 years. When I began my postdoc with CIGLR we were just starting to study the impacts of the recently invaded zebra mussels.

Read More