Geotech Hand Pump Transfer Vessels

Geotech hand pump transfer vessels may be used for liquid transfer or siphoning from one container into another.

Features

  • Compression port fittings
  • Uses 3/8" or 1/2" OD tubing
  • Holds up to 1 liter of liquid
Starting At $300.00
Stock SEE TABLE BELOW
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Geotech Hand Pump Transfer Vessels
77500001
Transfer vessel, 1 L, 1/4" ID x 3/8" OD compression ports
$300.00
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Geotech Hand Pumps
77500002
Transfer vessel, 1 L, 3/8" ID x 1/2" OD compression ports
$300.00
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