Geotech Hand Pump Transfer Vessels

Geotech hand pump transfer vessels may be used for liquid transfer or siphoning from one container into another.

Features

  • Compression port fittings
  • Uses 3/8" or 1/2" OD tubing
  • Holds up to 1 liter of liquid
Your Price $399.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
Geotech
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Geotech Hand Pump Transfer Vessels77500001 Transfer vessel, 1 L, 1/4" ID x 3/8" OD compression ports
$399.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
Geotech Hand Pumps 77500002 Transfer vessel, 1 L, 3/8" ID x 1/2" OD compression ports
$399.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
Geotech Hand Pump Transfer Vessels
77500001
Transfer vessel, 1 L, 1/4" ID x 3/8" OD compression ports
Drop ships from manufacturer
$399.00
Geotech Hand Pumps
77500002
Transfer vessel, 1 L, 3/8" ID x 1/2" OD compression ports
Drop ships from manufacturer
$399.00
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Geotech Hand Pumps 87500001 Plastic hand pump, 5' tubing (1/4" ID x 3/8" OD)
$99.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
Plastic hand pump, 5' tubing (1/4" ID x 3/8" OD)
Drop ships from manufacturer
$99.00
Questions & Answers
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