Global Water FL16 Flow Logger

The FL16 Water Flow Logger is designed for applications such as inflow & infiltration studies, stormwater and wastewater collection systems, open channels and a host of other gravity flow systems.

Features

  • Compact, self-powered and easy to use
  • User programmable start and stop alarms, engineering units, and field calibration setup
  • Automatic barometric pressure and temperature compensation
Your Price $1,292.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Global Water
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Global Water FL16 Flow LoggerARJ025 FL16 vented water flow logger, 0-3 ft pressure range, 25 ft cable, USB communications
$1,292.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Global Water Vented Level Sensor Cable AE0000 Extra vented level sensor cable, priced per foot
$3.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Global Water FL16 Protective Mounting Sleeve ASJ100 FL16 protective mounting sleeve, 2" capped PVC
$89.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

Global Water's FL16 Water Flow Logger revolutionizes flow data collection for applications such as inflow & infiltration studies, stormwater and wastewater collection systems, open channels and a host of other gravity flow systems. The FL16 Water Flow Loggers will record over 81,000 depth, temperature, water flow and velocity readings in sewer and drainage pipes, as well as other open channel applications like flumes, weirs and square channels. The specially engineered, non-fouling water level sensor works in depths as little as 0.5 inch and allows for deployment in manholes and other difficult to access areas without the need to enter the confined space.

The FL16 Water Flow Recorder's vented water flow sensor is fully encapsulated with marine-grade epoxy.  The water flow sensor's electronics are encapsulated so that moisture can never leak in through O-ring seals or work its way into the vent tube and cause drift or sensor failure, as is the case with many other vented water flow sensors. The vent tube is sealed directly to the wet-wet sensing element, and any moisture that may enter the vent tube from the Water Flow Recorder's housing will only contact the ceramic parts, not the electronics.

FL16 Water Flow Recorder's user-friendly Windows-based software is tailored specifically for calculating water flows in partially filled sewer and drainage pipes using the Manning's Equation, with pull-down menus for selecting and entering the necessary information. The Water Flow Recorder software has a unique calibration feature which allows users to view calculated water velocity, compare this to actual measured data, and adjust the water flow parameters to calibrate for the water flow conditions of a specific application. Water flow equations for over 40 standard flumes and weirs are provided, as well as user-definable custom lookup tables which can be used to convert water level to flow for virtually any application. Once configured, all setup and water flow parameters are stored in the Water Flow Recorder's memory and are uploaded to the software automatically upon connection. This information can also be saved to a file for later use, allowing Water Flow Recorders to be deployed in multiple locations without the need to re-enter the water flow parameters each time the Water Flow Recorders are moved. The Water Flow Recorders operate on two standard 9 volt batteries, which they monitor so you are never caught off guard with dead batteries. A third onboard lithium battery ensures your data will be safe in the event you are unable to change the 9V batteries before they fail. An optional protective housing includes hardware for mounting the Water Flow Recorders to a manhole step or other structure and also allows for easy installation and replacement in the field.

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