Global Water PL200-G Water Pressure Logger

The PL200-G Water Pressure Data Loggers make it easy to verify low water pressure complaints, locate water pressure spikes, and even provide water distribution system modeling data.

Features

  • Standard 3/4" garden hose pressure connection
  • Records over 81,000 pressure readings
  • Fast 10X/second recording mode to catch spikes and dips
Your Price $586.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Global Water PL200-G Water Pressure LoggerFT0000 PL200-G water pressure logger, 3/4" garden hose thread
$586.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

Global Water’s PL200-G Water Pressure Datalogger makes it easy for you to verify low water pressure complaints, locate water pressure spikes, and even provide data for water distribution system modeling. With its standard ¾" garden hose connection and compact, water-resistant enclosure, you can use the PL200-G to record water pressure data just about anywhere.

The unit’s massive memory buffer will store over 81,000 readings, with user-defined intervals from 1 per second to more than 1 per year. You can easily capture momentary pressure spikes and dips with the PL200-G’s fast, 10 water pressure samples per second sampling mode. You can also use the unit’s programmable start and stop alarm times to synchronize multiple PL200-G’s to start at the same
time, delay starting until a preset time, or limit the number of recordings during a day.

The unit operates on two standard 9 volt batteries, which it monitors so you will not be caught off guard with dead batteries. Data is stored in nonvolatile flash memory so your water pressure data will be safe.

The PL200-G is equipped with a standard USB data port and includes our user friendly Global Logger II Windows software, which allows for easy setup, calibration, upload, and data transfer to a spreadsheet program on your laptop or desktop PC. The Global Logger II software also has online help files that are easily accessed using drop down menus and links so that you can quickly find the answers
to your questions.

Note: 64 bit operating systems are not currently supported.

Questions & Answers
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