Global Water RG200 Tipping Bucket Rain Gauge

The Global Water RG200 Rain Gauge is a durable weather instrument for monitoring rain rate and total rainfall.

Features

  • Constructed of high impact UV-protected plastic
  • Reliable, highly accurate, and simple to operate
  • 6 inch opening with 40 ft cable included
List Price $264.60
Your Price $251.37
Stock 8AVAILABLE

Overview
The Global Water RG200 is a durable weather instrument for monitoring rain rate and total rainfall. With minimal care, the rain gauge will provide many years of service. All rain gauges are constructed of high-impact UV-protected plastic to provide reliable, low-cost rainfall monitoring. The simplicity of the rain gauge design assures trouble-free operation yet provides accurate rainfall measurements.

With Purchase
G200 rain gauges have a 6-inch orifice and are shipped complete with mounting brackets and 40 ft of two-conductor cable. The rain gauge sensor mechanism activates a sealed reed switch that produces a contact closure for each 0.01 inch or 0.25 mm of rainfall.

  • (1) RG200 rain gauge with 40 ft. cable
  • (1) Set of mounting screws, strainer, metric conversion weight
  • (1) Manual
Questions & Answers
What's the difference between the RG600 and RG200?
The RG200 is a 6" rain gauge with a 40 ft two-conductor cable. The RG600 is an 8" rain gauge with a 25 ft two-conductor cable.
How should I take care of my rain gauge?
The RG200 should be cleaned periodically. An accumulation of dirt, bugs, etc. on the tipping bucket will adversely affect the readings.
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Global Water RG200 Tipping Bucket Rain Gauge
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RG200 tipping bucket rain gauge, 6"
Your Price $251.37
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