Global Water SP250 Quick Release Water Sampler

Global Water's SP250 quick release water sampler is ideal for sample removal from wastewater, shallow wells and surface water, including lakes, ponds, and holding pools.

Features

  • Easy interface with speed control for exact sample size with no spilling
  • Quick release Masterflex pump head for reduced maintenance
  • Accepts Masterflex tubing sizes 13, 14, 16, 25, 17 & 18
List Price $1,428.00
Your Price $1,356.60
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Global Water
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Global Water SP250 Quick Release Water SamplerCJ0500 SP250 quick release water sampler
$1,356.60
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Global Water SP250 Quick Release Water Sampler
CJ0500
SP250 quick release water sampler
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
$1,356.60

The SP250 quick release water sampler is ideal for sample removal from wastewater, shallow wells and surface water, including lakes, ponds, and holding pools. The water sampler is lightweight, rugged, easy to use, weather resistant, and requires minimal maintenance. The peristaltic pump is designed to take a manual sample and has the ability to back flush the sample hose once you are finished taking the sample.

The water sampler operates using an external 12 volt DC power source that can supply at least 2 A continuous. The variable speed motor is reversible and can draw water samples at a wide range of speed. A power cord, 10 ft (3.05 m) long, is included with each quick release water sampler. The power cord is fitted with alligator clips for easy connection to most 12-volt DC batteries, including car batteries or small 12V, 5 AH gel cells.

To provide high sample integrity, the water sample only contacts the norprene and polyethylene tubing. The tubing is easily cleaned or replaced. The Masterflex easy load design and adjustable tubing retention system allow for multiple tubing sizes and for changing the tubing without removing the pump head from the drive. To avoid cross contamination or lengthy decontamination procedures simply change the inexpensive tubing between samples.

  • (1) SP250 Quick Release Water Sampler
  • (1) 10 ft. 12VDC Power Cable
  • (1) Length of Size 17 PharMed BPT Pump Tubing
  • (1) 15 ft. Length of 1/4" ID Polyethylene Tubing
  • (1) Intake Strainer
Questions & Answers
How should I set up the intake strainer?

The intake strainer should be submerged under water and should be situated to avoid contact with the bottom.

How does the sampler receive power?

The water sampler operates using an external 12 volt DC power source such as a battery. A 10ft power cord is included and fitted with alligator clips for easy connection to most 12V batteries, including car batteries or small 12V, 5 AH gel cells.

Please, mind that only logged in users can submit questions

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