Hach Carbon Dioxide Digital Titrator Kit

Hach carbon dioxide digital titrator kit, CA-DT, digital titrator, 10.1-1000 mg/L, 50 tests

Features

  • Quick to set up - eliminates cleaning and assembly chores
  • Accuracy of +/-1% for most samples
  • Multiple titration methods available
Your Price $272.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Hach
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Hach Carbon Dioxide Digital Titrator Kit2064100 Carbon dioxide digital titrator kit, CA-DT, digital titrator, 10.1-1000 mg/L, 50 tests
$272.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Hach Carbon Dioxide Digital Titrator Kit
2064100
Carbon dioxide digital titrator kit, CA-DT, digital titrator, 10.1-1000 mg/L, 50 tests
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$272.00
Weighing just 132 grams (less than 4 oz.), the Hach carbon dioxide digital titrator kit performs titrations quickly and economically at the bench or in the field. The Digital Titrator accommodates interchangeable titrant cartridges, so multiple titrations merely involve changing the cartridge and delivery tube. Snapping cartridges in and out saves the time associated with cleaning and assembling cumbersome, fragile glass burets and virtually eliminates the possibilities of cross contamination and over-titrating.

Designed and built for durability, the Digital Titrator comes with a lifetime warranty Hach Company will repair or replace it free of charge, provided it has not been abused. So carry it to sample sites within the water or wastewater plant; take it to the field for ecology or water quality studies - the Digital Titrator is built to withstand heavy use.
  • Faster than a burette
  • Accurate to +/-1%
  • Complete portability
  • Interchangeable cartridges
  • Multiple titration methods available
  • Range: 10 - 1000 mgL as CO2
  • Delivery: 800 digits/mL or 0.00125 mL/digit
  • Accuracy: +/-1% for readings over 100 digits (Uncertainty of readings is 1 digit. Most samples require more than 100 digits)
  • Weight: 132 g (4.7 oz.)
  • (1) Digital titrator
  • (1) Titration cartridge, 0.3636 N
  • (1) Titration cartridge, 3.3636 N
  • (50) Phenolphthalein reagent powder pillows
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