Hach Free & Total Chlorine Test Strips

Hach's water quality test strips are ideal for performing semi-quantitative spot-checks or field tests.

Features

  • Quickly take water quality measurements
  • Wide variety and range of parameters
  • Convenient for field use
Starting At $22.99
Stock Drop Ships From Manufacturer  
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Hach Free & Total Chlorine Test Strips2745050 Free & total chlorine test strips, 0-10 mg/L, 50 tests
$22.99
Drop Ships From Manufacturer  
Hach Free & Total Chlorine Test Strips 2793944 Free & total chlorine test strips, 0-10 mg/L, 250 tests, individually wrapped
$246.00
Drop Ships From Manufacturer  
Hach Free & Total Chlorine Test Strips
2745050
Free & total chlorine test strips, 0-10 mg/L, 50 tests
Drop Ships From Manufacturer  
$22.99
Hach Free & Total Chlorine Test Strips
2793944
Free & total chlorine test strips, 0-10 mg/L, 250 tests, individually wrapped
Drop Ships From Manufacturer  
$246.00
Hach's water quality test strips are ideal for performing semi-quantitative spot-checks or field tests. They are manufactured with a unique reagent pad at the tip, using proven chemistries based on standard reference methods. Simply dip a strip into the sample, wait for color to develop, and compare color on the reagent pad to the color chart on the bottle. Test strips are available for a wide selection of parameters, with new strips being added regularly.
Questions & Answers
what are the reagents MTK, TMK, and TMB and how do they differ from DPD?

MTK and TMK both stand for Thio-Michler's ketone (Michler's thioketone) and react with certain metals, including gold, silver, mercury and palladium. This reagent can be used for residual chlorine studies. TMB is tetramethylbenzidine and changes color when it comes into contact with ethyl acetate (turns blue/green) or chlorine (turns yellow). DPD is used to determine chlorine concentration by the vividness of the color produced. Depending on the specific reagent model, it can measure free and total chlorine concentrations from 0.02 -10 mg/L. Manganese can interfere with DPD reagents, but not with TMK/MTK reagents.

Please, mind that only logged in users can submit questions

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