Hach m-Endo Prepared Agar Plates

m-Endo prepared agar plates provide fast, easy detection of total coliform bacteria in water and wastewater

Features

  • Detects total coliform bacteria in 24 hours
  • Specifically identifies colonies for easy evaluation
  • 1 CFU/ 100 mL sensitivity
Your Price $96.30
Usually ships in 3-5 days
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Hach m-Endo Prepared Agar Plates2811615 m-Endo Prepared Agar Plates, pack of 15
$96.30
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Hach m-Endo prepared agar plates provide fast, easy detection of total coliform bacteria for water quality evaluation in water and wastewater. A membrane filter with sample is placed on the prepared agar plate which is inverted and placed in an incubator for 24 hours. After incubation, total coliform bacteria colonies will be red and have a greenish-gold metallic sheen, so they can be easily counted and observed.
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