Hach sensION+ 5021T Laboratory Combination pH Electrode

Hach's sensION+ 5021T is a glass combination pH electrode with a refillable reference electrolyte and built-in temperature sensor.

Features

  • Precision temperature measurement with the patented ContATC system
  • 3-in-1 probe design made for the most difficult sample types
  • Encapsulated cartridge reference system ensures premium stability and long lifespan
Your Price $412.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
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Hach sensION+ 5021T Laboratory Combination pH ElectrodeLZW5021T.97.002 sensION+ 5021T Laboratory Combination pH Electrode, difficult (LIS) applications
$412.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days

The Hach sensION+ 5021T is a glass combination pH electrode with a refillable reference electrolyte and built-in temperature sensor. The 5021T has a fixed 1 meter cable with BNC connector (pH) and banana (temperature) connectors. It is intended for use with Hach sensION+ Laboratory pH meters. The 5021T has sleeve junction with a design that ensures high electrolyte flow making it very hard to clog, as well as an encapsulated reference system with silver ion barrier. It and is ideal for pH measurements in low ionic strength applications, samples with colloids, wines and paints or viscous samples such as emulsions and creams.

 

The 5021T's ContATC sytem provides precision temperature measurement required for high performance analysis. This patented system utilizes a thermo-conductive silicone to improve the speed and performance of the Pt1000 temperature sensor.

  • Filling Solution: LZW9500.99
  • Material Sensor Body: Glass
  • Special Feature: Clog-free Sleeve Junction for low ionic strength.
  • Temperature Range: Continuous use: 0 - 60 °C
  • Thermistor: Pt1000
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