HGPC187i

NexSens Galvanized Chain

NexSens Galvanized Chain

Description

Galvanized chain is used to construct mooring lines for buoy-based water quality applications requiring single or multi-point moorings.

Features

  • Ideal for mooring NexSens data buoys
  • Galvanized steel construction
  • Provides corrosion resistance in fresh and salt water applications
Your Price
$0.64
Usually ships in 3-5 days

Shipping Information
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Details

When setting up a mooring system to hold a buoy, a heavy bottom chain is a necessity. This chain must be laid out on the bottom to set and hold the anchor properly, create a catenary curve, and absorb shock. A good rule of thumb for heavy chain length is 1.5 times the maximum water depth. A smaller sized chain or mooring line should be used to connect the heavy bottom chain to the data buoy at the surface.
Notable Specifications:

  

Size Weight/ft (lbs) Working Load Limit (lbs)
3/16" 0.41 750
1/4" 0.68 1250
3/8" 1.47 2650
1/2" 2.52 2650
5/8" 4.06 6900
3/4" 5.81 10600
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
NexSens Galvanized Chain HGPC187i Galvanized chain, 3/16", priced per ft.
$0.64
Usually ships in 3-5 days
NexSens Galvanized Chain HGPC250i Galvanized chain, 1/4", priced per ft.
$1.16
Usually ships in 3-5 days
NexSens Galvanized Chain HGPC375i Galvanized chain, 3/8", priced per ft.
$2.90
Usually ships in 3-5 days
NexSens Galvanized Chain HGPC500i Galvanized chain, 1/2", priced per ft.
$4.50
Usually ships in 3-5 days
NexSens Galvanized Chain HGPC625i Galvanized chain, 5/8", priced per ft.
$6.70
Usually ships in 3-5 days
NexSens Galvanized Chain HGPC750i Galvanized chain, 3/4", priced per ft.
$11.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
NexSens Stainless Steel Bow Shackles SSPA187i-BOW Stainless steel bow shackle, 3/16"
$2.80
Usually ships in 3-5 days
NexSens 3/16" Stainless Steel Mooring Lines SS187-10 Custom built 3/16" vinyl coated SS mooring line, 10'
$60.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Additional Product Information:

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