PONSEL DIGISENS Probe Guard

The PONSEL probe guard includes a stainless steel weight for use with all DIGISENS sensors.

Features

  • Protects the sensors during sampling
  • Perforations allow water to pass through
  • O-ring compression fitting to keep guard in place
List Price $232.00
Your Price $174.00
Stock 1AVAILABLE
Questions & Answers
No Questions
Please, mind that only logged in users can submit questions

Select Options

  Products 0 Item Selected
Image
Part #
Description
Price
Stock
Quantity
PONSEL DIGISENS Probe Guard
PF-ACC-C-00170
DIGISENS probe guard with stainless steel weight
$174.00
1 Available
Notice: At least 1 product is not available to purchase online
×
Multiple Products

have been added to your cart

There are items in your cart.

Cart Subtotal: $xxx.xx

Go to Checkout

In The News

Ponsel Digisens smart water quality sensors designed with connectivity in mind

Ponsel launched in 1948 in Versailles as a compilation of engineers working with researchers from France’s first government agriculture and water quality agencies. Since then, the manufacturer has built water quality instruments. “Ponsel has the culture to develop robust instruments, to provide open communications protocols and to be specialized in optical measurement,” said Xavier Broise, export business development manager for Aqualabo Group, which now owns Ponsel. Ponsel’s latest offering are the Digisens smart sensors that give users the capability to connect to a data logger or handheld interface and gather readings. The sensors are designed to ensure quality data and compatibility for simple integration into monitoring systems.

Read More

Not So Quiet Polar Night: Arctic Creatures Found to be Active During Dark Part of the Year

Most people need little more than a comfortable pillow, a blanket, and a dark room to drift off into a multi-hour snooze. Many researchers assumed that once plunged into darkness for about half the year during the polar night, most polar creatures would do the same: fall asleep and take a big nap for as long as the darkness lasted. But Jon Cohen, associate professor of marine sciences, school of marine science and policy, in the College of Earth, Ocean, and the Environment at the University of Delaware, wondered if that was true. Despite the technical challenges of monitoring biota in very low light conditions, Cohen and his team were determined to find out if krill, copepods, and other creatures were dozing off in the dark or seeking out prey, light, and each other.

Read More

Orange Stream Dreams: Monitoring Acid Mine Drainage and Watershed Health

Not many young people pondering careers come up with the words “acid mine drainage.” But Jen Bowman, Director of Environmental Programs at the Voinovich School at Ohio University, could not help but be fascinated by what she saw during her days as an Ohio University student collecting field samples. “My interest in acid mine drainage, and how it affects watersheds, goes way back to my undergraduate days,” she explains. “We saw firsthand how streams could be impacted by drainage from abandoned mines. Sometimes streams had such severe problems they turned orange. It was hard not to be struck by that. I was drawn in to the many associated challenges, keeping watersheds clean, and improving stream health.

Read More