PONSEL DIGISENS Probe Guard

The PONSEL probe guard includes a stainless steel weight for use with all DIGISENS sensors.

Features

  • Protects the sensors during sampling
  • Perforations allow water to pass through
  • O-ring compression fitting to keep guard in place
List Price $232.00
Your Price $174.00
In Stock
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
PONSEL DIGISENS Probe GuardPF-ACC-C-00170 DIGISENS probe guard with stainless steel weight
$174.00
In Stock
PONSEL DIGISENS Probe Guard
PF-ACC-C-00170
DIGISENS probe guard with stainless steel weight
In Stock
$174.00
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