9502BNWP

Thermo Orion Gas Sensing Carbon Dioxide Electrode

Thermo Orion Gas Sensing Carbon Dioxide Electrode

Description

Orion carbon dioxide gas sensing combination electrode, waterproof BNC connector, 1m cable

Features

  • Sensing and reference half-cells built into one electrode
  • Decreased amount of required solutions and reduced waste
  • Fast, simple, and accurate measurements
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List Price
$885.00
Your Price
$796.50
Usually ships in 3-5 days

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Details

The Thermo Orion gas sensing carbon dioxide electrode allows fast simple, economical, and accurate measurements of carbon dioxide, carbonate, and bicarbonate aqueous solutions.
Notable Specifications:
  • Construction: Gas sensing combination
  • Measurement Range: 10(-2) to 10(-4) M / 440 to 4.4 ppm
  • Temp Range: 0 to 50 C
  • Required Reference Electrode: Included
  • Reference Filling Solution: 950202
  • Calibration Standards: 0.1 M NaHCO3 (950206) / 1000 ppm as CaCO3 (950207)
  • Required ISA: 950210
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Thermo Orion Gas Sensing Carbon Dioxide Electrode 9502BNWP Orion carbon dioxide gas sensing combination electrode, waterproof BNC connector, 1m cable
$796.50
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Thermo Orion Carbon Dioxide Internal Fill Solution 950202 Orion carbon dioxide internal fill solution, 60 mL
$80.46
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Thermo Orion Carbon Dioxide Standard 950206 Orion carbon dioxide standard, 0.1 M NaHCO3, 475 mL
$94.50
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Thermo Orion Carbon Dioxide Standard 950207 Orion carbon dioxide standard, 1000 ppm CaCO3, 475 mL
$93.60
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Thermo Orion Carbon Dioxide ISA 950210 Orion carbon dioxide ISA, 475 mL
$96.30
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Thermo Orion Carbon Dioxide Electrode Membranes 950204 Orion carbon dioxide electrode membranes with o-rings, pack of 4
$179.10
Usually ships in 3-5 days

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