Thermo Orion Gas Sensing Carbon Dioxide Electrode

Orion carbon dioxide gas sensing combination electrode, waterproof BNC connector, 1m cable

Features

  • Sensing and reference half-cells built into one electrode
  • Decreased amount of required solutions and reduced waste
  • Fast, simple, and accurate measurements
List Price $911.00
Your Price $819.90
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Thermo Scientific
Free Lifetime Tech SupportFree Lifetime Tech Support
Free Ground ShippingFree Ground Shipping
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Thermo Orion Gas Sensing Carbon Dioxide Electrode9502BNWP Orion carbon dioxide gas sensing combination electrode, waterproof BNC connector, 1m cable
$819.90
Usually ships in 3-5 days
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Thermo Orion Carbon Dioxide Internal Fill Solution 950202 Orion carbon dioxide internal fill solution, 60 mL
$82.89
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Thermo Orion Carbon Dioxide Standard 950206 Orion carbon dioxide standard, 0.1 M NaHCO3, 475 mL
$97.20
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Thermo Orion Carbon Dioxide Standard 950207 Orion carbon dioxide standard, 1000 ppm CaCO3, 475 mL
$96.30
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Thermo Orion Carbon Dioxide ISA 950210 Orion carbon dioxide ISA, 475 mL
$99.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Thermo Orion Carbon Dioxide Electrode Membranes 950204 Orion carbon dioxide electrode membranes with o-rings, pack of 4
$184.50
Usually ships in 3-5 days
The Thermo Orion gas sensing carbon dioxide electrode allows fast simple, economical, and accurate measurements of carbon dioxide, carbonate, and bicarbonate aqueous solutions.
  • Construction: Gas sensing combination
  • Measurement Range: 10(-2) to 10(-4) M / 440 to 4.4 ppm
  • Temp Range: 0 to 50 C
  • Required Reference Electrode: Included
  • Reference Filling Solution: 950202
  • Calibration Standards: 0.1 M NaHCO3 (950206) / 1000 ppm as CaCO3 (950207)
  • Required ISA: 950210
Questions & Answers
No Questions
Please, mind that only logged in users can submit questions

In The News

Multi-paddock grazing gives gassy cattle a chance to help sequester carbon, study suggests

Ruminant livestock, including beef and dairy cattle, as well as goats and sheep, account for about 27 percent of methane production in the U.S., making them significant contributors to overall greenhouse gas production. An ongoing study from Arizona State University is exploring whether these same livestock might actually help sequester carbon from the atmosphere when managed under some innovative practices. Using a technique called adaptive multi-paddock grazing, farmers would delegate livestock to small fields for short periods of grazing. Livestock are ushered between a greater number of fields more frequently than in traditional management schemes, emulating the migratory habits of wild herd animals.

Read More

River Management On a Changing Planet

River management is inherently complex, demanding mastery of constantly dynamic conditions even when the climate is stable. As the climate changes, however, river management will become even more difficult and unpredictable—and old models and techniques are likely to fail more often. Now, researchers from around the world are calling for attention and change to how we manage and model the rivers of the world. Dr. Jonathan Tonkin , a Rutherford Discovery Fellow at New Zealand's University of Canterbury , spoke to EM about why he is arguing that current tools for river management are no longer enough as even historical baseline river ecosystem conditions themselves are changing. Dr.

Read More

A Floating Environmental Stewardship Classroom Visits Ohio

This summer a new way to learn about water recreation—and environmental stewardship—paddled into Ohio. With the help of the Toledo Metropolitan Area Council of Governments (TMACOG) , the US Environmental Protection Agency's (US EPA's) Urban Waters Program brought the Wilderness Inquiry Canoemobile “floating classroom” to Toledo for a few days. TMACOG Water Quality Planner Sara Guiher spoke to EM about the programming and the experience. “In August of 2018 we spoke with a representative from US EPA Urban Waters,” explains Guiher. “We received funding through them to bring programming to the area focused on urban water resources. The person that we talked to from US EPA suggested Canoemobile, which we had never heard of.

Read More