Thermo Orion pH Electrode Storage Solution

Thermo Scientific offers Orion pH electrode storage solutions to maximize the life of your pH electrode.

Features

  • For use with silver chloride (Ag/AgCl) pH electrodes
  • Select from 60mL, 475mL, and 20L containers
  • Maximizes the life of your Orion pH electrode
List Price $61.30
Your Price $55.17
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Thermo Scientific
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Thermo Orion pH Electrode Storage Solution910001 Orion pH electrode storage solution, (1) 475mL bottle
$55.17
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Thermo Orion pH Electrode Storage Solution 910060 Orion pH electrode storage solution, (5) 60mL bottles
$57.78
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Thermo Orion pH Electrode Storage Solution 9100CB Orion pH electrode storage solution, (1) 20L cubitainer
$145.80
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Thermo Orion pH Electrode Storage Solution
910001
Orion pH electrode storage solution, (1) 475mL bottle
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$55.17
Thermo Orion pH Electrode Storage Solution
910060
Orion pH electrode storage solution, (5) 60mL bottles
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$57.78
Thermo Orion pH Electrode Storage Solution
9100CB
Orion pH electrode storage solution, (1) 20L cubitainer
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$145.80
Thermo Scientific offers Orion pH electrode storage solutions to maximize the life of your pH electrode.
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