Used Solinst 50' Direct Read Cable Assembly

Direct read cables are designed for direct communication with Levelogger sensors without pulling the sensor from the well.

Features

  • 1/10" dia. coaxial cable with HDPE outer jacket for strength and durability
  • Upper end of direct read cable is fitted with a connector that can act as a well cap for 1" wells
  • Used equipment includes 90-day warranty through Fondriest Environmental
$87.50
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Direct read cables are available for attachment to any Levelogger, new or old, in standard lengths of: 15', 50', 100', 200', 250', and 300'. The 1/10" diameter (2.54 mm) coaxial cable has an HDPE outer jacket for strength and durability. A stranded stainless steel braided conductor gives non-stretch accuracy.

The lower end of the direct read cable has a miniaturized infra-red optical reader. The top cap of the Levelogger is removed and the direct read cable is threaded in its place. In turn, the upper end of the cable is attached to a portable computer or Leveloader, via a USB or RS232 PC Interface Cable. This allows viewing of the data, downloading and/or programming in the field

The upper end of the direct read cable is fitted with a connector that can act as a well cap for a 1" well. This connector fits Solinst Levelogger well caps designed for 2" or 4" wells, and can easily be tethered at surface in other situations.
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Solinst Direct Read Cable Assembly
104766-R
Used Solinst direct read cable assembly, 50'
$87.50
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