Vaisala Bird Spike Kit

The optional Vaisala Bird Spike Kit for WXT and WMT transmitters is designed to reduce the interference that birds cause to the wind and rain measurement.

Features

  • Consists of a metallic band with spikes pointing upward
  • Kit is installed on top of the transmitter and attached with a screw
  • Spikes are designed so that interference with wind and rain measurement is minimal
Your Price $135.00
In Stock
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Vaisala Bird Spike Kit212793 Bird spike kit
$135.00
In Stock
The optional Vaisala Bird Spike Kit for WXT and WMT transmitters is designed to reduce the interference that birds cause to the wind and rain measurement. The kit consists of a metallic band with spikes pointing upward. The kit is installed on top of the transmitter and attached with a screw. The shape and location of the spikes has been designed so that the interference with wind and rain measurement is minimal.

The spikes are designed not to hurt the birds; they are simply a barrier to make it more difficult for birds to land on top of the transmitter. Note that the Vaisala bird spike kit does not provide complete protection against birds, but it does render the transmitter unsuitable for roosting and nest building.
  • (1) Vaisala Bird Spike Kit
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