Vaisala RS-232/485-to-USB Cable Adapter

The Vaisala RS-232/485-to-USB cable adapter is designed for permanent PC-based applications with the WXT520 or WMT52 sensors.

Features

  • Converts RS-232 or RS-485 signal to USB for direct PC connection
  • M12 connector for connection to WXT520 weather sensor or WSP152 surge protector
  • 1.4m cable length for easy access to sensor
Your Price $113.00
In Stock
Vaisala
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Vaisala RS-232/485-to-USB Cable Adapter220782 RS-232/485-to-USB cable adapter with 8-pin M12 female connector, 1.4m
$113.00
In Stock
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Vaisala WSP152 Surge Protector WSP152 Surge protector for host PC (e.g. USB connection). Includes M12 connectors. For use with 220782 and 215952.
$363.00
In Stock
Vaisala 8-pin M12 Cable with Dual Connectors 215952 8-pin M12 cable with female & male connectors, 10m
$290.00
In Stock
  • (1) Vaisala RS-232/485-to-USB Cable Adapter
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