YOUNG Portable Tripod

The YOUNG 18940 Portable Tripod is a convenient stand for the temporary installation of meteorological sensors.

Features

  • Constructed of corrosion resistant materials
  • Extendable top section with mounting post that fits RM Young wind sensors
  • For extra stability, Model 18943 Guy Wire Assembly may be used
$532.00
Stock Drop Ships From Manufacturer  

Overview
The RM Young 18940 is lightweight and sturdy, constructed from corrosion-resistant material. The tripod features an extendable top section with a mounting post that fits Young wind sensors. One leg is articulated for leveling on uneven surfaces. For extra stability, Model 18943 Guy Wire Assembly may be used.

  • Height: Adjustable 1.7m (66") to 2.9m (114")
  • Base: Legs extend 76cm (30") maximum from center
  • Collapsed Size: 18cm (7") diameter x 155cm (61") L
  • Weight: 4.1 kg (9 lb)
  • Shipping Weight: 5.3 kg (12 lb)
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YOUNG Portable Tripod
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Portable tripod
$532.00
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