YSI 1001A Amplified pH Sensor

The YSI 1001A pH sensor has an internal, battery-powered pre-amplifier for use in difficult environments.

Features

  • Elimination of potentially erratic readings in high static environments
  • Improved sensitivity and stability in very cold waters and long cable lengths
  • Potentially longer life if used and stored properly;> 2 years
List Price $241.00
Your Price $228.95
In Stock
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
YSI 1001A Amplified pH Sensor605323 1001A amplified pH sensor
$228.95
In Stock
YSI 1001A Amplified pH Sensor 605216 1001A amplified pH sensor & extension adapter
$244.15
In Stock
YSI 1001A Amplified pH Sensor
605323
1001A amplified pH sensor
In Stock
$228.95
YSI 1001A Amplified pH Sensor
605216
1001A amplified pH sensor & extension adapter
In Stock
$244.15
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
YSI Probe Guard Extension Adapter 655575 Extension adapter for 556 and Pro Series 1010 & 1020 dual port cable assemblies
$42.75
In Stock
Extension adapter for 556 and Pro Series 1010 & 1020 dual port cable assemblies
In Stock
$42.75
The YSI 1001A pH and combination pH/ORP sensors have an internal, battery-powered pre-amplifier for use in difficult environments. The amplified sensors are approximately 0.75" (1.91cm) longer than the Model 1001 pH or 1003 pH/ORP Sensors. The available extension adapter attaches to the bulkhead so the longer sensors fit in the probe guard for the Pro1010 and Pro1020 cables (not needed on the Pro Plus Quatro cable). All YSI flow cells work normally with the new sensors.

Advantages include:
  • Elimination of potentially erratic readings in high static environments
  • Improved sensitivity and stability in applications with very cold waters and for applications requiring long cable lengths
  • Applications that require a long duration in the field where there is the potential for exposure of the connectors to moisture
  • Potentially longer life if used and stored properly;> 2 years
  • (1) YSI 1001A pH electrode
  • (1) Storage bottle with solution
  • (1) Instruction sheet
  • (1) Cleaning certificate
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