YSI 1001A Amplified pH Sensor

The YSI 1001A pH sensor has an internal, battery-powered pre-amplifier for use in difficult environments.

Features

  • Elimination of potentially erratic readings in high static environments
  • Improved sensitivity and stability in very cold waters and long cable lengths
  • Potentially longer life if used and stored properly;> 2 years
List Price $261.00
Starting At $247.95
Stock 6AVAILABLE
The YSI 1001A pH and combination pH/ORP sensors have an internal, battery-powered pre-amplifier for use in difficult environments. The amplified sensors are approximately 0.75" (1.91cm) longer than the Model 1001 pH or 1003 pH/ORP Sensors. The available extension adapter attaches to the bulkhead so the longer sensors fit in the probe guard for the Pro1010 and Pro1020 cables (not needed on the Pro Plus Quatro cable). All YSI flow cells work normally with the new sensors.

Advantages include:
  • Elimination of potentially erratic readings in high static environments
  • Improved sensitivity and stability in applications with very cold waters and for applications requiring long cable lengths
  • Applications that require a long duration in the field where there is the potential for exposure of the connectors to moisture
  • Potentially longer life if used and stored properly;> 2 years
  • (1) YSI 1001A pH electrode
  • (1) Storage bottle with solution
  • (1) Instruction sheet
  • (1) Cleaning certificate
Questions & Answers
Are there any additional steps that need to be taken to calibrate the amplified probe, that would be different than for a non-amplified probe?

No. The amplified probe can be calibrated the same way as standard pH probes. Instructions can be found in the manual on page 25. www.fondriest.com/pdf/ysi_proquatro_manual.pdf 

 

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YSI 1001A Amplified pH Sensor
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1001A amplified pH (ISE) sensor
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YSI 1001A Amplified pH Sensor
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1001A amplified pH (ISE) sensor & extension adapter
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