YSI 6155 Optical DO Membrane Kit

The YSI 6155 optical DO membrane kit is a replacement kit for the 6150 ROX optical dissolved oxygen sensor.

Features

  • YSI recommends that membrane is replaced annually
  • User-replaceable membrane with step-by-step instructions
  • Includes tool for replacing membrane
Your Price $175.00
In Stock
YSI
Government and Educational PricingGovernment and Educational Pricing
Free Lifetime Tech SupportFree Lifetime Tech Support
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
YSI 6155 Optical DO Membrane Kit606155 6155 optical DO membrane kit
$175.00
In Stock
YSI 6155 Optical DO Membrane Kit
606155
6155 optical DO membrane kit
In Stock
$175.00
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
YSI 6150 ROX Dissolved Oxygen Sensor 606150 6150 ROX optical dissolved oxygen sensor with self-cleaning wiper
Request Quote
Usually ships in 3-5 days
6150 ROX optical dissolved oxygen sensor with self-cleaning wiper
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Request Quote

Note:  All optical DO membranes are now manufactured from anti-fouling copper alloy; these membranes directly replace black plastic membranes. Anti-fouling membranes can be used on existing ROX probes with no detrimental effects on data. The copper-alloy YSI 6155 optical DO membrane may arrive with surface patina and/or discoloration. This will not affect membrane performance.

  • (1) YSI 6155 optical DO membrane
  • (3) Installation screws
  • (1) Hex wrench
  • (1) Instruction sheet with calibration coefficients
Questions & Answers
How do I replace the membrane?

The 6155 kit comes with everything required for installation. To replace the membrane, remove the old membrane and clean around the probe face. Make sure the surface under the membrane is clean and dry before replacing. After replacing the new membrane, power the sonde and enter the calibration constants (K numbers included with the membrane kit).

Please, mind that only logged in users can submit questions

In The News

Wisconsin watershed program involves high schools to collect, share data

A group of high schoolers in the Green Bay, Wisc. area are learning about careers in environmental science thanks to the Lower Fox River Watershed Monitoring Program . The program, supported by the University of Wisconsin, has involved more than 700 students since its 2003 launch. “We have almost ten years of data,” said Annette Pelegrin, program coordinator. “It began in 2003 with five watersheds. We’ve trained teachers and schools that are interested and showed them how to measure different parameters.” Those include flow, temperature, transparency and turbidity of the program’s streams. YSI 55 meters are used to measure dissolved oxygen and levels of phosphorus, ammonia and nitrogen are checked with a Hach colorimeter.

Read More

A Nationwide View shows “Evolution” of Water Quality Concerns

Water quality issues are shifting in the United States’ rivers in big ways. Those changes are driven, in part, by the way the land in a watershed is used and they’re big enough that researchers may need to change the way they think about water quality in the American rivers. “What was striking to us was how perceptions of water quality issues from several decades ago may need to be updated,” said Edward Stets, a U S Geological Survey research ecologist, in an email response to questions from Environmental Monitor. New research by Stets published in Environmental Science & Technology in March highlights these shifting water quality issues.

Read More

Breaking Down the Research Magic Being Captured by Duke’s WIzARD

The start of Duke University’s oceanographic mooring line doesn’t begin at the surface of the ocean, but 500 meters beneath it. Floating at the top of the mooring system is a 64-inch syntactic sphere with 2,500 Lbs of buoyancy. It serves a duo of roles as both a floatation device and housing for two high-end acoustic monitoring systems. Next comes 75 meters of chains and wires before coming to two ocean current profilers, one pointing up and the other pointing down. Next to that equipment are two instruments that measure temperature and salinity.  Next comes several hundred more meters of wire before arriving at several glass balls, more floatation orbs.

Read More