YSI 6155 Optical DO Membrane Kit

The YSI 6155 optical DO membrane kit is a replacement kit for the 6150 ROX optical dissolved oxygen sensor.

Features

  • YSI recommends that membrane is replaced annually
  • User-replaceable membrane with step-by-step instructions
  • Includes tool for replacing membrane
Your Price $180.00
In Stock
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
YSI 6155 Optical DO Membrane Kit606155 6155 optical DO membrane kit
$180.00
In Stock
YSI 6155 Optical DO Membrane Kit
606155
6155 optical DO membrane kit
In Stock
$180.00
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
YSI 6150 ROX Dissolved Oxygen Sensor 606150 6150 ROX optical dissolved oxygen sensor with self-cleaning wiper
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In Stock
6150 ROX optical dissolved oxygen sensor with self-cleaning wiper
In Stock
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Note:  All optical DO membranes are now manufactured from anti-fouling copper alloy; these membranes directly replace black plastic membranes. Anti-fouling membranes can be used on existing ROX probes with no detrimental effects on data. The copper-alloy YSI 6155 optical DO membrane may arrive with surface patina and/or discoloration. This will not affect membrane performance.

  • (1) YSI 6155 optical DO membrane
  • (3) Installation screws
  • (1) Hex wrench
  • (1) Instruction sheet with calibration coefficients
Questions & Answers
How do I replace the membrane?

The 6155 kit comes with everything required for installation. To replace the membrane, remove the old membrane and clean around the probe face. Make sure the surface under the membrane is clean and dry before replacing. After replacing the new membrane, power the sonde and enter the calibration constants (K numbers included with the membrane kit).

Please, mind that only logged in users can submit questions

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