MA150

Extech MA150 200A Mini AC Clamp Meter + NCV Detector

Extech MA150 200A Mini AC Clamp Meter + NCV Detector

Description

The Extech 200A Mini Clamp meter + Non-Contact Voltage Detector increases user safety by including a built-in voltage detector in the jaw tip.

Features

  • Measures DC Current, AC/DC Voltage, and Resistance
  • Diode and Continuity test
  • Max hold function
Your Price
$54.99
In Stock

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Details

The Extech MA120 is a clamp-on meter that measures 200A AC Current up to 100mA resolution. The MA120 also includes a non-contact AC Voltage detector (120/240VAC, 50/60Hz) that provides the user with extra protection and safety because they can detect dangerous voltage before even testing the meter. The 0.7 (18mm) jaw opening is for a 300MCM cable size. Other features include a 2000 count LCD display, built-in white LED flashlight, data hold, auto power off, and overload protection. Additionally, it measures DC current, AC/DC voltage, and resistante, as well as performs diode and continuity tests.

Notable Specifications:
  • AC current range: 200A
  • AC current maximum resolution: 100mA
  • AC current basic accuracy: ±2.5%
  • AC voltage: non-contact/600V
  • AC voltage maximum resolution: 0.1mV
  • Resistance range: 20MΩ
  • Resistance maximum resolution: 0.1Ω
  • Resistance basic accuracy: ±3.0%
  • Dimensions: 7x2.5x1.3" (178x65x32mm)
  • Weight: 6 oz (170g)
What's Included:
  • (1) Meter
  • (2) AAA batteries
  • (1) Soft case
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Extech MA150 200A Mini AC Clamp Meter + NCV Detector MA150 200A mini AC clamp meter + NCV detector
$54.99
In Stock
Extech MA150 200A Mini AC Clamp Meter + NCV Detector MA150-NIST 200A mini AC clamp meter + NCV detector, NIST traceable
$129.99
Drop ships from manufacturer

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