82050097

Geotech Manual Water Level Meters

Geotech Manual Water Level Meters

Description

Geotech water level meters are portable instruments built to measure water levels in deep monitoring wells and bore holes.

Features

  • Highly accurate Polyethylene coated steel well tape
  • Durable field serviceable 5/8" probe with stainless steel conductors
  • Prevent false triggering with adjustable sensitivity
Your Price
$2,454.00
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Details

The Geotech Water Level Meters are portable instruments built to accurately measure water levels in deep monitoring wells and bore holes. The manual well tape detects water levels with a 5/8" O.D. stainless steel weighted probe attached to a tape marked to 1/100th of a foot. The tape is mounted on a heavy-duty steel and aluminum reel with optional electric rewind.

The well tape relies on fluid conductivity to determine the presence of water. An audible signal and visible LED light activate when the probe contacts water. This water level meter incorporates a sensitivity adjustment to prevent false triggering.
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Geotech Manual Water Level Meters 82050097 Level meter with 5/8" probe, poly tape, manual rewind & English increments, 1500'
$2454.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
Geotech Manual Water Level Meters 82050101 Level meter with 5/8" probe, poly tape, manual rewind & English increments, 2000'
$3052.00
Drop ships from manufacturer

Questions & Answers

| Ask a Question
How long will the battery last?
The 9 Volt DC alkaline battery will last up to 8 hours of continuous detecting. When not in use, the meter should be stored with the switch in the OFF position. If the meter will be stored for more than three months, the battery should be removed.
How do I prevent false triggers?
The sensitivity of the probe can be adjusted to prevent false triggering while still detecting water levels.

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