2009S

LI-COR Underwater PAR Sensor Lowering Frame

LI-COR Underwater PAR Sensor Lowering Frame

Description

LI-COR Underwater PAR Sensor Lowering Frame

Features

  • Stability for proper orientation of sensors
  • Minimizes shading effects
  • Lower mounting ring for stabilizing weight attachment
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Details

The 2009S LI-COR Underwater PAR Sensor Lowering Frame provides for the placement of two underwater cosine sensors, one each for downwelling or upwelling radiation, or a single LI-193SA Spherical Quantum Sensor. The 2009S provides stability for proper orientation of the sensor(s), minimizes shading effects, and features a lower mounting ring for stabilizing weight attachment if necessary.
Notable Specifications:
  • Construction: Anodized aluminum
  • Size: 51.4 L (20.0") x 35.6 cm W (14.0")
  • Weight: 327g (0.72 lbs)
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
LI-COR Underwater PAR Sensor Lowering Frame 2009S Lowering frame for LI-COR underwater PAR sensors Usually ships in 3-5 days

In The News

LI-COR PAR sensors detect light waves to aid aquatic ecosystem research

Understanding how the sun’s rays fuel phytoplankton or plant growth may prove valuable to understanding an aquatic ecosystem. A pair of sensors from LI-COR can help researchers studying algal blooms and aquatic vegetation by measuring how much light enters underwater environments. Sitting below the surface, the LI-192 flat-lensed photosynthetically active radiation sensor and the LI-193 spherical PAR sensor measure light waves striking their silicon photovoltaic detectors.  They sense light wavelengths between 400 and 700 nanometers, which is the ideal range for photosynthesis. Dave Johnson, a LI-COR product manager for the LI-190 series, said the sensors’ individual designs make them ideal for different applications.

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Ohio State greenhouse nurtures 'fruit fly of the plant world'

The Arabidopsis Biological Resource Center at Ohio State University was established in 1991 with funding from the National Science Foundation. Part of the center’s job is to meet demand for seed of the arabidopsis plant, which is widely used for genetic modeling. “A lot of the plants we’re growing are for seed production,” said Joan Leonard, greenhouse coordinator. “Arabidopsis is a good example. We call it the ‘fruit fly of the plant world,’ and it takes about six to eight weeks to go from seed to plant.” Arabidopsis is one of the many plants that will benefit from a new LI-COR PAR sensor being installed on campus. It will help manage light schedules for greenhouse plants.

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Researchers Find Link Between Climate Change and Gastrointestinal Illnesses

An understanding of climate change’s effects on the environment has become commonplace and grows every day, but one researcher from Florida State University is looking to answer a new question: What are climate change’s effects on people’s health? In one of the first studies of its kind, Chris Uejio, an assistant professor at FSU, and a team of researchers studied how climate change can affect the roughly 20 million Americans (according to the Environmental Protection Agency) who consume untreated drinking water on a daily basis. Because climate forecasts are predicting higher rainfall rates over the next few decades, coming down in intense storms, Uejio said those flashes could cause flare-ups in waterborne illnesses.

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