102841

Solinst Model 615N Drive-Point Piezometer

Solinst Model 615N Drive-Point Piezometer

Description

The Solinst model 615N drive-point piezometer is designed without a tubing barb for water level measurements. This saves money and provides better access for Water Level Meters.

Features

  • Affordable method to monitor shallow groundwater and soil vapor
  • Attach to inexpensive 3/4" (20 mm) NPT steel drive pipe
  • Can be used for permanent well points or short-term monitoring applications
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Your Price
$58.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

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Details

The Solinst Model 615 Drive-Point Piezometer uses a high quality stainless steel piezometer tip, 3/4" NPT pipe for drive extensions and LDPE or Teflon sample tubing, if desired. Combine these with an inexpensive Slide Hammer and you have a complete system.

The Solinst Model 615N Drive-Point Piezometer is designed without a tubing barb for water level measurements. This saves money and provides better access for Water Level Meters.
What's Included:
  • (1) Solinst Model 615N Drive-Point Piezometer
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Solinst Model 615N Drive-Point Piezometer 102841 Model 615N drive-point piezometer, 6"
$58.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst Model 615N Drive-Point Piezometer 102842 Model 615N drive-point piezometer, 12"
$79.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Solinst 101069 Model 615 stainless steel NPT extension, 1 ft.
$15.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst 101070 Model 615 stainless steel NPT extension, 2 ft.
$27.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst 101071 Model 615 stainless steel NPT extension, 3 ft.
$40.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst 102174 Model 615 manual slide hammer, 25 lb.
$166.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst 102932 Model 615 manual drive head assembly, includes drive head, tubing bypass & 2 ft. extension
$149.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

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