102841

Solinst Model 615N Drive-Point Piezometer

Solinst Model 615N Drive-Point Piezometer

Description

The Solinst model 615N drive-point piezometer is designed without a tubing barb for water level measurements. This saves money and provides better access for Water Level Meters.

Features

  • Affordable method to monitor shallow groundwater and soil vapor
  • Attach to inexpensive 3/4" (20 mm) NPT steel drive pipe
  • Can be used for permanent well points or short-term monitoring applications
More Views
Your Price
$58.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

Shipping Information
Return Policy
Why Buy From Fondriest?

Details

The Solinst Model 615 Drive-Point Piezometer uses a high quality stainless steel piezometer tip, 3/4" NPT pipe for drive extensions and LDPE or Teflon sample tubing, if desired. Combine these with an inexpensive Slide Hammer and you have a complete system.

The Solinst Model 615N Drive-Point Piezometer is designed without a tubing barb for water level measurements. This saves money and provides better access for Water Level Meters.
What's Included:
  • (1) Solinst Model 615N Drive-Point Piezometer
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Solinst Model 615N Drive-Point Piezometer 102841 Model 615N drive-point piezometer, 6"
$58.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst Model 615N Drive-Point Piezometer 102842 Model 615N drive-point piezometer, 12"
$79.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Solinst 101069 Model 615 stainless steel NPT extension, 1 ft.
$15.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst 101070 Model 615 stainless steel NPT extension, 2 ft.
$27.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst 101071 Model 615 stainless steel NPT extension, 3 ft.
$40.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst 102174 Model 615 manual slide hammer, 25 lb.
$166.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Solinst 102932 Model 615 manual drive head assembly, includes drive head, tubing bypass & 2 ft. extension
$149.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

In The News

New map shows significant groundwater depletion in Central California

Groundwater level data collected by a Central California county shows significant drops during the past 12 years, according to a San Luis Obispo Tribune article. Data shows that groundwater has dropped by a minimum of 70 feet from 1997 to 2009 in the Paso Robles area of Central California. In the past four years the areas of most significant decline have expanded north and south. Drought and agricultural withdrawals are the likely culprits for the groundwater decline. Some advocates are calling for more responsible water use by vineyards in the area, while farmers note that the recent drought did not help the situation.

Read More

USGS Scientists Identify Causes of High Concentrations of Radium in Aquifer Water

What exactly is happening far beneath our feet is typically a bit mysterious, requiring some special effort to study. Starting in the 1950s, reports of radium concentrations in excess of 5 picocuries per liter (pCi/L) in water from the Cambrian-Ordovician aquifer system started scientists thinking about the issue of radium in this massive aquifer which provides more than 630 million gallons of water each day to the public supply in Iowa, Illinois, Minnesota, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Missouri. Now, USGS scientists have published new research results, available online here , revealing how much radium is in the aquifer, and shedding light on how it gets there.

Read More

Guardians of the Riverbank: Planting Trees to Protect Water Quality and Wildlife

In fall of 2017, the Connecticut River Conservancy (CRC) along with their project partners improved more than 9,000 feet of riverbank by planting 5,690 native trees and shrubs to protect the Connecticut River and its tributaries. The trees now guard against erosion and pollution on seven farms in New Hampshire and Vermont, and expand the existing habitat for local wildlife. This kind of project is part of CRC's core work. In August of 2011, Hurricane Irene roared up the East Coast of the United States, leaving a tell-tale path of destruction behind. Listed as the eighth-costliest hurricane in American history, the storm also hurt the watershed of the Connecticut River.

Read More