109609

Solinst USB Direct Read Interface Cable

Solinst USB Direct Read Interface Cable

Description

The Solinst USB direct read interface cable allows you to obtain real-time data from a Solinst Levelogger without removing it from the water.

Features

  • Allows the user to view and download Levelogger data in the field
  • Levelogger can also be re-programmed without disturbing level readings
  • Field-rugged connectors for use office or field
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$203.00
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  • (1) Solinst USB direct read interface cable
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Solinst USB Direct Read Interface Cable 109609 USB direct read interface cable
$203.00
In Stock

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