AMS Mini Soil Core Sampling Kits

AMS soil core sampling kits provide all the components needed to auger up to 12' and then collect a virtually undisturbed soil core sample in a liner.

Features

  • Used worldwide by soil scientists, agronomists, and construction companies
  • Designed to provide all the items needed for sampling in a convenient carrying case
  • 5/8" threaded connection type
Your Price $1,033.81
Drop ships from manufacturer
AMS
Government and Educational PricingGovernment and Educational Pricing
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Free Ground ShippingFree Ground Shipping
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
AMS Mini Soil Core Sampling Kits209.07 3 1/4" Soil Core Sampling Mini Kit
$1,033.81
Drop ships from manufacturer
AMS 209.05 3 1/4" SST Soil Core Sampling Mini Kit
$1,500.92
Drop ships from manufacturer
AMS Mini Soil Core Sampling Kits
209.07
3 1/4" Soil Core Sampling Mini Kit
Drop ships from manufacturer
$1,033.81
AMS
209.05
3 1/4" SST Soil Core Sampling Mini Kit
Drop ships from manufacturer
$1,500.92
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
AMS Plastic Liners 425.07 3/4" X 12" Plastic Liner
$1.65
Drop ships from manufacturer
3/4" X 12" Plastic Liner
Drop ships from manufacturer
$1.65
  • (1) Regular auger
  • (4) 3' extensions
  • (1) Cross handle
  • (1) Soil core sampler
  • (1) Slide hammer
  • (2) Plastic end caps
  • (1) Plastic liner
  • (2) Wrenches
  • (1) Universal slip wrench
  • (1) Poly-canvas case
Questions & Answers
Can I use a quick connect connection with the mini soil core sampling kit?

No, the quick connect system is not designed to work with slide hammers, which are necessary for soil core sampler applications.

Where can I order more liners?

A variety of sizes of plastic liners are available. A link to these liners is available under the Accessories tab.

Please, mind that only logged in users can submit questions

In The News

Farmer-invented automated soil sampler reduces human error

A North Carolina farmer has developed a mobile soil sampling system with virtually no risk of human error, Southeast Farm Press reported . Allan Baucom, a grain and cotton farmer with more than 6,000 acres around Monroe, N.C., built the automated soil sampler to keep up with his expanding agricultural operations -- and growing variety of soil types. Named “the Falcon”, the sampler can take up to 12 samples and once, and store 200 before being unloaded. Two Falcons currently exist: one works Baucom’s farm, while the other operates on farms around the country to ensure the sampler’s efficiency in different environments. The sampler is expected to be made available soon, and will host new features, such as computer-interfaced electronic system for use with a laptop or tablet.

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Charles River Algal Blooms Stop Swimming and Launch a Floating Wetland

The Charles River used to be a swimming hotspot for Cambridge and Boston residents. Decades of industrial pollution and nutrient runoff have degraded water quality and eliminated public swimming in the Lower Charles, but a movement is afoot to get Boston and Cambridge back in the water. One step toward the goal of a safely swimmable river—without the need to obtain a permit, as is now necessary—is detecting and managing the harmful algal blooms that appear on the river. An experimental floating wetland and new research and analysis of water quality data that shows a possible effective detection system for algal blooms on the Charles River are two new steps toward the goal of safe, accessible swimming.

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Harnessing the Gulf Stream for Renewable Energy

The Gulf Stream, the massive western boundary current off the east coast of North America, moves water from the Gulf of Mexico north and west across the Atlantic Ocean. There’s a lot of energy in that much moving water and researchers are trying to put it to use. Although the Gulf Stream’s path shifts (researchers say it acts like a wiggling garden hose), in a couple of spots, it stays relatively stable. At one such spot off the coast of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, researchers have dropped moorings and research instruments to study the current with the eventual goal of harnessing it for renewable energy.

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