Extech 407026 Heavy Duty Light Meter

The Extech Heavy Duty Light Meter enhances accuracy by selecting one of four lighting types to display in foot candles or lux.

Features

  • Four lighting types
  • Cosine and color corrected measurements
  • Other functions include "ZERO" re-calibration, Data Hold, & MAX/MIN/AVG readings
Starting At $209.99
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Extech 407026 Heavy Duty Light Meter407026 Heavy duty light meter with PC interface
$209.99
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Extech 407026-NIST Heavy duty light meter with PC interface, NIST traceable
$341.99
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Extech 407026 Heavy Duty Light Meter
407026
Heavy duty light meter with PC interface
Check Availability  
$209.99
Extech
407026-NIST
Heavy duty light meter with PC interface, NIST traceable
Check Availability  
$341.99
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Extech 407001-USB USB Adapter 407001-USB USB adapter used with 407001 Data Acquisition software & serial cable
$53.99
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Extech 409997 Large Soft Vinyl Pouch Carrying Case 409997 Large soft vinyl pouch carrying case
$22.99
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Extech 407001-USB USB Adapter
407001-USB
USB adapter used with 407001 Data Acquisition software & serial cable
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$53.99
Extech 409997 Large Soft Vinyl Pouch Carrying Case
409997
Large soft vinyl pouch carrying case
Check Availability  
$22.99

The Extech Heavy Duty Light Meter enhances accuracy by selecting one of four lighting types: tungsten/daylight, fluorescent, sodium, or mercury. The meter utilizes precision diode and color correction filter, and adjusts for cosine and color corrected measurements. The microprocessor assures maximum accuracy through and Fc range of 200.0, 2000, and 5000Fc and a lux range of 2000, 20,000, and 50,000lux. 

 

The built-in RS232 serial interface provides a connection with the optional Windows Data Acquisistion Software that enables users to display and capture readings on a PC, and set time intervals and alarms. The battery operated datalogger module stores over 8000 readings for later transfer to a PC.

  • Circuit: custom one-chip LSI microprocessor circuit
  • Display: 3.5 digit (2000 count) LCD display with contrast adjustment
  • Measurement ranges: LUX: 0 to 50,000 LUX (3 range), Fc: 0 to 5000 Fc (3 range), relative mode: 0 to 1999%
  • Data hold: freezes displayed reading
  • Lighting types: Sodium, daylight/tungsten, fluorescent, & Mercury
  • Sensor structure: cosine/color corrected photo-diode meets CIE
  • Memory store/recall: records/recalls max/min/avg readings
  • Sample rate: 0.4 seconds (approx.) per reading
  • Zero adjust: push-button procedure
  • Auto power off: after approx. 10 minutes
  • Data output: RS-232 PC serial interface
  • Operating conditions: 32 to 122F (0 to 50C),< 80% RH
  • Power supply: 9 V battery
  • Power consumption: approx. 5 mA DC (approx. 200hr battery life)
  • 2,000 LUX range: 0-1,999 LUX display, 1 LUX resolution
  • 20,000 LUX range: 1,800-19,990 LUX display, 10 LUX resolution
  • 50,000 LUX range: 18,000-50,000 LUX display, 100 LUX resolution
  • 200 FC range: 0-186.0 FC display, 0.1 FC resolution
  • 2,000 FC range: 167-1,860 FC display, 1 FC resolution
  • 5,000 FC range: 1,670-5,000 FC display, 10 FC resolution
  • Relative mode: range: 0-1999%, resolution: 1%
  • Accuracy: +/-(4% + 2 digits) of full scale (applies to a calibration performed using a precision standard incandescent tungsten light source of 2856K with a meter on the tungsten setting.)
  • Dimensions: instrument: 7.1"x2.8"x1.3" (180x72x32mm), sensor: 3.3"x2.2"x0.7" (85x55x17.5mm)
  • Weight: 0.71 lbs. (320g)
  • Warranty: 3 years
  • (1) Light meter
  • (1) 9 V battery
  • (1) Light sensor
  • (1) Protective cover with 46" (1.2m) cable
  • (1) Protective holster with stand
Questions & Answers
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