Extech EA33 EasyView Light Meter with Memory

The Extech EasyView Light Meter with Memory stores and recalls up to 50 light measurements with relative or real time clock stamp.

Features

  • Luminous intensity (candela) calculations
  • Multiple point average function
  • Cosine and color corrected
Your Price $289.99
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Extech EA33 EasyView Light Meter with MemoryEA33 EasyView light meter with memory
$289.99
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Extech EA33-NIST EasyView light meter with memory, NIST traceable
$414.99
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

The Extech EasyView Light Meter with Memory features a wide measurement range to 99,990Fc (999,900lux) with resolution of 0.001Fc and 0.01lux for taking measurements in direct sunlight. The ripple function excludes the effect of stray light from the primary light source measurement. The measurements are also cosine and color corrected. It stores and recalls up to 50 measurements with relative or real time clock stamp.

  • Display counts: 999,999 count LCD
  • Fc range: 9.999Fc, 99.99Fc, 999.9Fc, 9,999Fc, 99,990Fc
  • Lux range: 99.99Lux, 999.9Lux, 9999Lux, 99,990Lux, 999,900Lux
  • Maximum resolution: 0.001Fc/0.01Lux
  • Basic accuracy: +/-3%
  • Cosine & color corrected: yes
  • Dimensions: 5.9"x2.8"x1.4" (150x72x33mm)
  • Weight: 11.29oz (320g)
  • CE: Yes
  • Warranty: 1 year
  • (1) Light meter
  • (1) Built-in stand
  • (1) Light sensor
  • (1) Protective cover with 36" (0.9m) coiled cable
  • (1) Protective holster
  • (6) AAA batteries
  • (1) Case
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