Extech EC170 Salinity and Temperature Meter

The Extech EC170 measures salinity in aquaculture, environmental studies, ground water, irrigation and drinking water applications.

Features

  • Built-in NaCl Conductivity to TDS conversion factor
  • Automatic Temperature Compensation
  • Waterproof design to withstand wet environment
Your Price $79.19
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
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Extech EC170 Salinity and Temperature MeterEC170 Salinity/temperature meter
$79.19
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Extech EC170 Salinity and Temperature Meter
EC170
Salinity/temperature meter
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
$79.19

The Extech Salinity Meter is an autoranging instrument that offers 2 ranges of measurement. A built-in NaCl conductivity to TDS conversion factor and automatic temperature compensation ensure accuracy and reliability. The large 3.5 digit (2000 count) dual LCD screen displays salinity readings in ppt and the temperature in Celsius or Fahrenheit. Meeting IP65 standards, the meter's waterproof design withstands wet environments. Applications include measuring salinity in aquaculture, environmental studies, groundwater, irrigation, and drinking water.

  • Salinity Ranges: 0 to 10.00ppt, 10.1 to 70.0ppt
  • Salinity Maximum Resolution: 0.01ppt, 0.1ppt
  • Salinity Basic Accuracy: ±2% FS
  • Temperature Range: 32° to 122°F (0 to 50°C)
  • Temperature Maximum Resolution: 0.1°F/°C
  • Temperature Basic Accuracy: ±0.9°F/0.5°C
  • Power: Four LR44 button batteries
  • Dimensions: 1.3 x 6.5 x 1.4" (32 x 165 x 35mm)
  • Weight: 3.8oz (110g)
  • (1) Meter
  • (1) Salinity sensor
  • (1) Protective sensor cap
  • (4) LR44 button batteries
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