Extech TB400 Portable Turbidity Meter

The Extech TB400 Portable Turbidity Meter conveniently tests the turbidity of water up to 1000 NTU.

Features

  • Requires only a 10mL sample size
  • Battery operated for field and on-site testing
  • Splash-proof front panel
Your Price $619.99
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Extech
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Extech TB400 Portable Turbidity MeterTB400 Portable turbidity meter
$619.99
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Extech 10mL Test Bottles BTL10 10mL test bottles for CL500/TB400, pack of 2
$25.99
Drop ships from manufacturer
Extech Turbidity Standard Solutions NTU-TB Turbidity standard solutions, 0 NTU and 100 NTU bottle
$29.99
Drop ships from manufacturer

Extech's TB400 measures turbidity up to 1000 NTU. A microprocessor-based circuitry assures high accuracy and repeatable readings. Its portable design and splash-proof front panel allow for direct on-site measurements. Typical applications include the measurement of municipal water, food and beverage water, or other aqueous solutions where fluid clarity is important.

  • Range (NTU): 0.00 to 50.00 NTU, 50 to 1000 NTU
  • Resolution: 0.01 NTU
  • Accuracy: ±5% FS or ±0.5 NTU, whichever is greater
  • Light Source: LED, 850nm
  • Standard: designed to meet ISO 7027
  • Response Time: <10 seconds
  • Dimensions: 6.1 x 3.0 x 2.4" (155 x 76 x 62mm)
  • Weight: 11.3oz (320g)
  • (1) TB400 meter
  • (1) 0 NTU standard solution test bottle
  • (1) 100 NTU standard solution test bottle
  • (1) Cleaning solution (distilled water)
  • (6) AAA batteries
  • (1) Hard carrying case
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