Geotech Oil/Water Interface Probes With Float

The Geotech Interface Probe With Float is a portable reel-mounted instrument that provides measurements of liquids lighter and heavier than water.

Features

  • Audible & visible alarms activated on reel when probe contacts product & water
  • Highly accurate Tefzel coated steel tape marked in engineering or metric increments
  • Extremely durable polypropylene storage reel with rugged aluminum frame
Your Price $1,387.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
Geotech
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Geotech Oil/Water Interface Probes With Float82050015 Interface probe with float & English increments, 100 ft.
$1,387.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
Keck KIR 200' Oil/Water Interface Meter 82050001 Interface probe with float & English increments, 200 ft.
$1,598.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
Keck KIR 300' Oil/Water Interface Meter 82050003 Interface probe with float & English increments, 300 ft.
$1,820.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Geotech Replacement Float Kit 52050038 Replacement float kit, 2 ea.
$36.00
Drop ships from manufacturer

The Geotech Interface Probe With Float is a portable reel-mounted instrument that provides measurements of liquids lighter and heavier than water. When the Interface Probe is lowered down a well and contacts the product layer, a solid tone and red light alarm is activated at the reel. When the probe detects water, the tone begins to oscillate and the light changes to green.

The durable storage reel is made from polypropylene with a rugged aluminum frame. The probe consists of a stainless steel and FEP probe attached to a reel-mounted, Tefzel coated engineer's tape. The engineer's tape comes in engineering or metric increments and is accurate to 1/100 of a foot. The probe has a float which detects hydrocarbon levels and a pair of stainless steel contacts for sensing conductive fluids The Interface Probe includes padded carrying case and tape guide.

  • (1) Interface probe with float
  • (1) Carrying case
  • (1) Tape guide
  • (1) Operations manual
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