Global Water GL500 Multi-Channel Data Logger

The Global Water GL500 multi-channel data logger features 7 analog channels and 2 digital channels for data recording.

Features

  • Monitor up to 9 sensors at a time in addition to battery voltage
  • Four sample modes: 10 times per second, timed, logarithmic, and exception
  • Both USB and Serial communication ports
Your Price $750.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Global Water
Government and Educational PricingGovernment and Educational Pricing
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Global Water GL500 Multi-Channel Data LoggerFQ0000 GL500 multi-channel data logger
$750.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Global Water GL500 Data Logger Enclosure Upgrade FE0850 GL500 data logger enclosure upgrade, includes rechargeable 12V battery & charger
$266.00
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Global Water WE100 Barometric Pressure Sensor EA0000 WE100 barometric pressure sensor, 25 ft. cable
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Global Water WE300 Solar Radiation Sensor EB0000 WE300 solar radiation sensor, 25 ft. cable
$1,031.00
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Global Water WE550 Wind Speed Sensor EC0000 WE550 wind speed sensor, 25 ft. cable
$675.00
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Global Water WE570 Wind Direction Sensor ED0000 WE570 wind direction sensor, 25 ft. cable
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Global Water WE600 Humidity Sensor EE0000 WE600 humidity sensor, 25 ft. cable
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Global Water WE710 Surface Temperature Sensor EFA000 WE710 surface temperature sensor, 25 ft. cable
$389.00
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Global Water WE700/WQ101 Temperature Sensor DA0000 WE700/WQ101 temperature sensor, 25 ft. cable
$389.00
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Global Water WL400 Vented Water Level Sensor AIA025 WL400 vented water level sensor with 25 ft. cable, 3 ft. range
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Global Water WL705 Ultrasonic Water Level Sensors AQS003 WL705 ultrasonic water level sensor with 6 ft. cable, 3 ft. range
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The Global Water GL500 multi-channel data logger features 7 analog channels and 2 digital channels for data recording. The GL500 can record over 40,000 readings and has four unique recording options, fast (10 samples per second), programmable interval (1 second to multiple years), logarithmic, and exception. The data logger also has a sample on demand input that triggers a recording of special events, such as when a water sampler was triggered, when a door was opened, etc. Daily start and stop alarm times can be programmed to limit recording intervals during a day. The GL500 includes Windows software, allowing easy upload of data to a laptop or desktop.

An optional version with integrated Bluetooth 2.0 allows users to access data and settings without the use of a custom connection cable. Using a laptop or desktop computer with Bluetooth capability, the data logger's data and settings can be viewed, stored and programmed using the Global Logger II desktop software package, as well as the Flow Monitor software. All of the features in these data logger software packages are available using the Bluetooth interface. Because the Bluetooth module draws power when turned on, the data logger features a power switch to turn it off when not in use.  A red LED indicates when the data logger's Bluetooth module is on and a blue LED shows the status of the Bluetooth connection.

The GL500 data logger is setup to accept any 4-20mA sensor and provides switched power to the sensors based on the sample interval and sensor warm up time settings. Twisted pair 2-wire and 3-wire sensors can be quickly connected to the data logger's terminal strip and calibrated via the Global data logger software. Sensors can be accessed through dial-out to a remote modem attached to the GL500's serial communication port. The data logger software has online help files that are easily accessed using drop down menus and links to quickly find the answers to questions.

Questions & Answers
No Questions
Please, mind that only logged in users can submit questions

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