Global Water WQ101 Temperature Sensor

Global Water's WQ101 temperature sensor is a rugged reliable temperature measuring device for air (WE700) or water applications.

Features

  • Sensor output is 4-20mA with a two wire configuration
  • Each sensor is mounted on 25 ft. of marine-grade cable
  • Electronics are encapsulated in marine-grade epoxy with stainless steel housing
List Price $486.00
$461.70
Stock 1AVAILABLE

Overview
The Global Water WQ101 is a rugged, reliable temperature measuring device for air (WE700) or water applications. The probe is mounted on up to 500 ft. of marine grade cable and has a two-wire configuration for minimum current draw. The unit's electronics are completely encapsulated in marine-grade epoxy within a stainless steel housing.

Output 4-20 mA
Range

-58 to +122° F (-50 to +50°C)

Accuracy ±0.2°F or ±0.1°C
Maximum Pressure 200 psi
Operating Voltage 10-36 VDC

Current Draw

Same as sensor output

Warm Up Time

5 seconds minimum

Operating Temperature 58 to +212° F (-50 to +100°C)
Size of Probe 3/4" Diameterx 4-1/2" L (1.9 cm dia. x 11.4 cm long)
Weight 8 ounces (227 g)
Questions & Answers
How should I store my sensor?
The temperature sensor may be stored without any special provisions. Place the sensor inside a bag to keep the sensor clean and store on a shelf or hang it on a wall.
What is the warm up time for this sensor?
The WQ101 Temperature Sensor has a minimum warm up time of 5 seconds.
How accurate is this sensor?
The WQ101 Temperature sensor is has an accuracy of +/-0.2 F or +/- 0.1 C
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Global Water WQ101 Temperature Sensor
DA0000
WQ101/WE700 temperature sensor, 25 ft. cable
$461.70
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Global Water WQ101 Temperature Sensor
DA0050
WQ101/WE700 temperature sensor, 50 ft. cable
$517.75
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