Global Water WE700/WQ101 Temperature Sensor

Global Water's WE700/WQ101 temperature sensor is a rugged reliable temperature measuring device for air or water applications.

Features

  • Sensor output is 4-20mA with a two wire configuration
  • Each sensor is mounted on 25 ft. of marine-grade cable
  • Electronics are encapsulated in marine-grade epoxy with stainless steel housing
Your Price $389.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Global Water
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Global Water WE700/WQ101 Temperature SensorDA0000 WE700/WQ101 temperature sensor, 25 ft. cable
$389.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Global Water Extra Cable DH0000 Extra sensor cable, priced per foot
$2.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Global Water WE770 Solar Radiation Shield EG0000 WE770 solar radiation shield
$261.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Global Water EZ100 LCD Sensor Display GA0000 EZ100 LCD sensor display, battery powered
$522.00
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Global Water EZ100 LCD Sensor Display GB0000 EZ100 LCD sensor display, external VDC power
$522.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Global Water GL500-2-1 Data Logger FR0000 GL500U-2-1 data logger, USB
$440.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Global Water's WE700/WQ101 temperature sensor is a rugged reliable temperature measuring device for air or water applications. The probe is mounted on up to 500 ft. of marine grade cable and has a two-wire configuration for minimum current draw. The unit's electronics are completely encapsulated in marine grade epoxy within a stainless steel housing.
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