Global Water WE700/WQ101 Temperature Sensor

Global Water's WE700/WQ101 temperature sensor is a rugged reliable temperature measuring device for air or water applications.

Features

  • Sensor output is 4-20mA with a two wire configuration
  • Each sensor is mounted on 25 ft. of marine-grade cable
  • Electronics are encapsulated in marine-grade epoxy with stainless steel housing
List Price $442.05
Your Price $419.95
Stock 2AVAILABLE

Overview
The Global Water WQ101 is a rugged, reliable temperature measuring device for air or water applications. The probe is mounted on up to 500 ft. of marine grade cable and has a two-wire configuration for minimum current draw. The unit's electronics are completely encapsulated in marine-grade epoxy within a stainless steel housing.

Questions & Answers
How should I store my sensor?

The temperature sensor may be stored without any special provisions. Place the sensor inside a bag to keep the sensor clean and store on a shelf or hang it on a wall.

What is the warm up time for this sensor?

The WQ101 Temperature Sensor has a minimum warm up time of 5 seconds.

How accurate is this sensor?

The WQ101 Temperature sensor is has an accuracy of +/-0.2 F or +/- 0.1 C

Can I get a longer cable?

Yes, this temperature sensor can be ordered with an extended cable. Additional length is priced per foot under the Accessories tab.

Please, mind that only logged in users can submit questions

Select Options

  Products 0 Item Selected
Image
Part #
Description
Price
Stock
Quantity
Global Water WE700/WQ101 Temperature Sensor
DA0000
WE700/WQ101 temperature sensor, 25 ft. cable
$419.95
2 Available
  Accessories 0 Item Selected
Notice: At least 1 product is not available to purchase online
×
Multiple Products

have been added to your cart

There are items in your cart.

Cart Subtotal: $xxx.xx

Go to Checkout

In The News

Cooling water from Northeast U.S. power plants keeps rivers warmer

Rivers are a vital cooling source for power plants, but high-temperature water returned to rivers from the plants may detrimentally heat rivers and change aquatic ecosystems, according to a recent study. Scientists from the University of New Hampshire and the City College of New York gathered federal data on power plants and river systems and linked up river flow and heat transfer models to figure out just how hot rivers get in the northeastern U.S. They found that about one third of heat generated in thermoelectric power plants in the Northeast is drained into rivers via used cooling water. Just more than a third of the total heat generated at plants in the Northeast is converted directly into electricity for consumer use.

Read More

Coastal Restoration in Rhode Island

Anyone who has spent a significant amount of time in nature can likely relate to feeling connected and defensive toward protecting the environment. Heather Kinney, a coastal restoration scientist with The Nature Conservancy in Rhode Island, knows this feeling well, having felt a deep connection to nature her entire life. “I have always had a deep love for nature and the environment, particularly being out on the water and being drawn to the ocean, as cliché as that sounds,” says Kinney. Being so close to nature her entire life led Kinney to pursue a career in conservation and restoration. “You want to protect what you love, and I think that once I fell in love with it- it was something that I wanted to be able to pursue professionally,” she explains.

Read More

Not So Quiet Polar Night: Arctic Creatures Found to be Active During Dark Part of the Year

Most people need little more than a comfortable pillow, a blanket, and a dark room to drift off into a multi-hour snooze. Many researchers assumed that once plunged into darkness for about half the year during the polar night, most polar creatures would do the same: fall asleep and take a big nap for as long as the darkness lasted. But Jon Cohen, associate professor of marine sciences, school of marine science and policy, in the College of Earth, Ocean, and the Environment at the University of Delaware, wondered if that was true. Despite the technical challenges of monitoring biota in very low light conditions, Cohen and his team were determined to find out if krill, copepods, and other creatures were dozing off in the dark or seeking out prey, light, and each other.

Read More