Global Water WE700/WQ101 Temperature Sensor

Global Water's WE700/WQ101 temperature sensor is a rugged reliable temperature measuring device for air or water applications.

Features

  • Sensor output is 4-20mA with a two wire configuration
  • Each sensor is mounted on 25 ft. of marine-grade cable
  • Electronics are encapsulated in marine-grade epoxy with stainless steel housing
Your Price $389.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Global Water
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Global Water WE700/WQ101 Temperature SensorDA0000 WE700/WQ101 temperature sensor, 25 ft. cable
$389.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Global Water WE700/WQ101 Temperature Sensor
DA0000
WE700/WQ101 temperature sensor, 25 ft. cable
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
$389.00
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Global Water Extra Cable DH0000 Extra sensor cable, priced per foot
$2.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Global Water WE770 Solar Radiation Shield EG0000 WE770 solar radiation shield
$261.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Global Water WE820 Weather Station Mounting Frame EH0800 WE820 mounting frame, 1" x 6 ft. pole with 3 ft. crossbar
$335.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Global Water WE830 Weather Station Mounting Tripod EI0000 WE830 weather station mounting tripod
$188.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Global Water Extra Cable
DH0000
Extra sensor cable, priced per foot
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
$2.00
WE770 solar radiation shield
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
$261.00
WE820 mounting frame, 1" x 6 ft. pole with 3 ft. crossbar
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
$335.00
WE830 weather station mounting tripod
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
$188.00
Global Water's WE700/WQ101 temperature sensor is a rugged reliable temperature measuring device for air or water applications. The probe is mounted on up to 500 ft. of marine grade cable and has a two-wire configuration for minimum current draw. The unit's electronics are completely encapsulated in marine grade epoxy within a stainless steel housing.
Questions & Answers
How should I store my sensor?

The temperature sensor may be stored without any special provisions. Place the sensor inside a bag to keep the sensor clean and store on a shelf or hang it on a wall.

What is the warm up time for this sensor?

The WQ101 Temperature Sensor has a minimum warm up time of 5 seconds.

How accurate is this sensor?

The WQ101 Temperature sensor is has an accuracy of +/-0.2 F or +/- 0.1 C

Can I get a longer cable?

Yes, this temperature sensor can be ordered with an extended cable. Additional length is priced per foot under the Accessories tab.

Please, mind that only logged in users can submit questions

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