Global Water WS-Series Portable Samplers

The Global Water WS700 portable sampler combines all the features needed to meet a wide variety of water sampling requirements, including those for stormwater, industrial discharge, water and wastewater treatment, rivers, and streams.

Features

  • Can be configured for time-based or flow proportional samples
  • Rugged construction for harsh environments
  • Automatic backflush clears pickup strainer and hose
List Price $1,968.75
Starting At $1,870.31
Stock 1AVAILABLE

Overview
Global Water's WS700 single bottle and WS750 dual bottle samplers combine all the features needed to meet a wide variety of sampling requirements, including those for Stormwater, rivers and streams, industrial discharge, water and wastewater treatment and wastewater collection.

Enhanced Options
The WS705 and WS755 models provide the exact same functionality as their counterparts but are equipped with enhanced portability accessories, such as more ergonomic handles and durable wheels.

  • WS-Series portable sampler
  • 15’ of sampling hose
  • Intake strainer for each pump
  • Sampler Float Switch
  • 2.5 gallon polybottle for each pump (WS700, WS705)
  • 1 gallon polybottle for each pump (WS750, WS755)
  • Rechargeable battery
  • Battery charger
Questions & Answers
No Questions
Please, mind that only logged in users can submit questions

Select Options

  Products 0 Item Selected
Image
Part #
Description
Price
Stock
Quantity
Global Water WS-Series Portable Samplers
CU0000
WS700 portable sampler, one pump with one 2.5-gallon bottle
$1,870.31
1 Available
Global Water WS-Series Portable Samplers
CL0500
WS700-IBO portable sampler with ice bag, one pump with one 2.5-gallon bottle
$1,945.13
Check Availability  
Global Water WS-Series Portable Samplers
CU1000
WS705 portable sampler, one pump with one 2.5-gallon bottle
$1,940.14
Check Availability  
Global Water WS-Series Portable Samplers
CT0000
WS750 portable sampler, two pumps with two 1-gallon bottles
$2,092.76
Check Availability  
Global Water WS-Series Portable Samplers
CT1000
WS755 portable sampler, two pumps with two 1-gallon bottles
$2,419.44
1 Available
  Accessories 0 Item Selected
Notice: At least 1 product is not available to purchase online
×
Multiple Products

have been added to your cart

There are items in your cart.

Cart Subtotal: $xxx.xx

Go to Checkout

In The News

Treating Harmful Algal Blooms: A Natural Progression

Some of us happen upon the subject of our life’s work by accident, some of us are born into it, and some of us ease into it over time. For Tom Johengen, Research Scientist for Cooperative Institute for Great Lakes Research (CIGLR) and Director of Michigan Sea Grant , choosing to study Harmful Algal Blooms (HAB) was “a natural progression” from his days as a grad student investigating best management practices for controlling nonpoint source nutrient pollution. “I’ve been the research scientist with CIGLR since my postdoc in 1991, 31 years, and I’ve been the Director of Michigan Sea Grant for the past 3 years. When I began my postdoc with CIGLR we were just starting to study the impacts of the recently invaded zebra mussels.

Read More

The Coevolutionary Arms Race: Fungus-Growing Ants and Social Parasites

Despite the negative stereotypes surrounding social parasites, Rachelle Adams, Assistant Professor at The Ohio State University, knows just how important host-parasite relationships are to evolution. Like many ecologists, Adams, Assistant Professor at The Ohio State University, found her passion for nature in childhood. “It began when I was a kid. I had this general interest of nature, and I loved to spend time in the forest, exploring,” she recalls. Her desire to work with wildlife was solidified in college. “I didn’t know exactly what direction I was going to head in but the ecology and evolution classes I took were really central to shifting my perspective on ‘what is biology.’ It opened my eyes to seeing nature in a different way,” she explains.

Read More

Coral Resilience: Determining the Fate of Coral in a Changing Climate

It’s no secret that the Great Barrier Reef is dying, as are many beautiful reefs created by coral all over the world. Excessive heat and ocean acidification have taken their toll. But Andréa Grottoli, distinguished professor of earth sciences at The Ohio State University, President of the International Coral Reef Society, Director of the Coral Bleaching Research Coordination Network, and a Fulbright Fellow, believes that all is not lost. Grottoli has found that the fate of coral is tied to one characteristic: its resilience. “In my 20s, I decided I wanted to work on a problem to improve the world,” she recalls.

Read More