Hach Stream Survey Test Kit

The Stream Survey Kit tests ammonia (0-2.4 mg/L), nitrate (0-10 mg/L), dissolved oxygen (0.2-20 mg/L), pH (0-14), phosphate (total - 0-40 mg/L) and temperature (-10 to 110 C).

Features

  • Customized for the most widely used river and stream surveys
  • Parameters in the kit are known to correlate directly to the health of a river, stream, or creek
  • All tests are stored in rugged carrying case
Your Price $443.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Hach
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Hach Stream Survey Test Kit2712000 Stream survey test kit
$443.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Hach Stream Survey Test Kit
2712000
Stream survey test kit
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$443.00
The Hach Stream Survey Test Kit is customized for the popular river and stream surveys that are occurring in many watersheds by citizen and student groups. The Hach Stream Survey Test Kit features many of the most commonly tested parameters that are known to correlate directly to the health of a river, stream, or creek. The kit includes 100 tests for ammonia, nitrate, dissolved oxygen, pH, and total phosphate, in addition to unlimited temperature measurements with a rugged thermometer.
  • (1) pH Pocket Pal tester
  • (1) Rugged thermometer
  • (100) Ammonia tests
  • (100) Nitrate tests
  • (100) Dissolved oxygen tests
  • (100) Total phosphate tests
  • (1) Carrying case
  • All necessary apparatus and reagents for testing
Questions & Answers
How should I clean my labware?

Clean with a non-abrasive detergent or a solvent such as isopropyl alcohol. Use a soft cloth for drying. Do not use paper towels or tissue on plastic tubes to avoid scratching. Rinse with clean water (preferably deionized water).

Please, mind that only logged in users can submit questions

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