Heron barLog Barometric Pressure Logger

The barLog is used for long-term, automatic barometric compensation with the Heron dipperLog.

Features

  • Can be with synchronized with multiple dipperLogs at the same site
  • dipperLog program compensates with the barLog according to time and date matches
  • Fully automated interaction
Your Price $379.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Heron
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Heron barLog Barometric Pressure Logger5116 barLog barometric pressure logger
$379.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Heron barLog Barometric Pressure Logger
5116
barLog barometric pressure logger
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$379.00
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Heron dipperLog USB Communication Cable 5009 USB communication cable
$99.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
USB communication cable
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$99.00

The Heron barLog barometric pressure logger is designed for long-term, automatic barometric pressure compensation with the Heron dipperLog. The barLog can be used in conjunction with multiple dipperLog water level loggers at the same site.

The fully automated operation ensures that there is no need for elevation correction or post processing of any data. The dipperLog program will coordinate the barLog pressure logger with matching dipperLogs at the same site and will compsenate according to the time and date matches.

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