HyQuest Solutions TB3 Tipping Bucket Rain Gauge

HyQuest Solutions’ TB3 is a high-quality tipping bucket rain gauge for measuring rainfall and precipitation in urban and rural locations.

Features

  • Long-term stable calibration
  • Accuracy not affected by rainfall intensity
  • Minimal maintenance required
Your Price $1,220.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
HyQuest Solutions
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
HyQuest Solutions TB3 Tipping Bucket Rain GaugeTB3/0.01/P TB3 syphoning tipping bucket rain gauge, 0.01" per tip, 5m cable
$1,220.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
HyQuest Solutions TB3 Tipping Bucket Rain Gauge
TB3/0.01/P
TB3 syphoning tipping bucket rain gauge, 0.01" per tip, 5m cable
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
$1,220.00
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
NexSens Tipping Bucket Rain Gauge Mount 3510-M Mounting plate for tipping bucket rain gauges, 2" female NPT
$195.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Mounting plate for tipping bucket rain gauges, 2" female NPT
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$195.00

HyQuest Solutions’ TB3 is a high-quality tipping bucket rain gauge for measuring rainfall and precipitation in urban and rural locations. Due to the integrated syphon, the gauge delivers high levels of accuracy across a broad range of rainfall intensities.

The TB3’s tried and proven design ensures long-term, accurate and repeatable results. It is manufactured from high quality, durable materials ensuring long-term stability in the harshest of environments. It consists of a robust powder-coated aluminium enclosure, an aluminium base, and stainless steel finger filter and fasteners.

TB3 provides a finger filter that ensures the collector catch area remains unblocked when leaves, bird droppings and other debris find their way into the catch. The TB3’s base incorporates two water outlets at the bottom allowing for water collection and data verification. Maintenance of the TB3 is easy, because removal of the outer enclosure and access to the tipping bucket mechanism and finger filter assembly is made easy with quick release fasteners.

TB3 includes a dual output 24 VDC reed switch allowing for output redundancy or the addition of a second data logger. The reed switch incorporates varistor protection against surges that may be induced on long, inappropriately shielded signal cables.

Resolution 0.1 mm, 0.2 mm, 0.5 mm, 1.0 mm, 0.01 inch
Accuracy
  • O-250 mm per hour; +/-2 %
  • 250-500 mm per hour; +/-3 %
Range 700 mm per hour
Material
  • Enclosure and base: anodised and powder-coated aluminium
  • Bucket: painted brass or chrome plated ABS
Pivots Round sapphire pivots with hard stainless steel shaft

Dimensions & Mass

  • 200 mm diameter catch
  • 3.3 kg
  • 330 mm height
Environmental Conditions
  • Operating Temperature Range: -20 °C to +7O °C (heater recommended below +4 °C)
  • Humidity: 0-100 %
Questions & Answers
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