Nalgene Wide Mouth Sampling Bottles

Made of High-Density Polyethylene, these durable, general-purpose bottles can be used in the lab or field.

Features

  • Excellent chemical resistance to most acids, bases, and alcohols
  • Good for freezer use to -100 degrees C
  • Suitable for shipping liquids
Your Price $5.54
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Nalgene
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Nalgene Wide Mouth Sampling Bottles53596 Wide mouth sampling bottle, 125mL
$5.54
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Nalgene 250mL Wide Mouth Sampling Bottle 53597 Wide mouth sampling bottle, 250mL
$8.54
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Nalgene 500mL Wide Mouth Sampling Bottle 53664 Wide mouth sampling bottle, 500mL
$11.94
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Nalgene 1000mL Wide Mouth Sampling Bottle 53665 Wide mouth sampling bottle, 1000mL
$18.82
In Stock
Nalgene 2000mL Wide-Mouth Bottle 53662 Wide mouth sampling bottle, 2000mL
$26.52
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Made of High-Density Polyethylene (HDPE), these durable, general-purpose bottles can be used for countless applications in the lab or field because they are translucent and more rigid than LDPE.

The wide mouth makes it easy to fill with dry materials or liquids. The bottle offers excellent chemical resistance to most acids, bases, and alcohols. The bottle can be frozen to -100 degrees C and is suitable for shipping liquids.
  • (1) Wide mouth sampling bottle
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