3618A

Spectrum WatchDog A110 Temperature Logger

Spectrum WatchDog A110 Temperature Logger

Description

The WatchDog A110 loggers offer an affordable way to track ambient temperature conditions for analysis.

Features

  • LCD display confirms logger operation and displays current sensor readings
  • Select measurement intervals from 1 to 120 minutes
  • Log 4,000 to 8,000 intervals in fail-safe EEPROM data memory
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$76.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days

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Details

The WatchDog A-Series loggers offer an affordable way to track environmental conditions for analysis. Removable soft caps keep ports clear of debris, and slide out hanger makes attachment simple. SpecWare 9 (Pro or Basic) and the A-Series PC Connection Cable are required. The Radiation Shield is also recommended.

An LCD display confirms logger operation and provides current sensor readings. A-Series Loggers have a logger capacity up to 8,000 measurements (4,000 per channel using both channels); Select measurement intervals from 1 to 120 minutes. A 30 minute interval will record for 111 days before the station’s memory is full. Data is stored in fail-safe, EEPROM memory.

State-of-the-art low power consumption electronics are supported by an 12-month battery power source (CR2 included). No solar panels to purchase and maintain.

Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Spectrum WatchDog A110 Temperature Logger 3618A WatchDog A110 temperature logger
$76.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Image Part # Product Description Price Stock Order
Spectrum WatchDog A-Series PC Cable 3661A WatchDog A-Series PC cable
$30.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Spectrum SpecWare 9 Basic Software 3654B9 SpecWare 9 Basic software
$99.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Spectrum SpecWare 9 Pro Software 3654P9 SpecWare 9 Pro software
$199.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
Spectrum WatchDog Radiation Shield 3663A WatchDog A-Series & 1000 Series radiation shield
$87.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
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