Turner Designs C-sense pCO2 Sensor

Turner Designs C-sense pCO2 probes are compact, lightweight sensors for measurement of the partial pressure of gas in liquids.

Features

  • Accuracy 3% of full scale
  • Submersible to 600m
  • Low power consumption: 80mA @ 6 VDC
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Turner Designs C-sense pCO2 Sensor

Turner Designs C-sense pCO2 probes are compact, lightweight sensors for measurement of the partial pressure of gas in liquids. Designed for applications involving immersion in water, oil, or water and oil mixtures, the sensors combine an oil-resistant interface with a compact, temperature-compensated non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) detector. Designed for integration, C-sense enables pCO2 monitoring at a significantly lower price than traditional pCO2 sensors.

  • (1) C-sense pCO2 sensor
  • (1) Copper antifouling guard
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Turner Designs C-sense pCO2 Sensor
2410-001
C-sense in-situ pCO2 sensor with drop-in membrane, 0-1,000ppm range
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Turner Designs C-sense pCO2 Sensor
2410-002
C-sense in-situ pCO2 sensor with drop-in membrane, 0-2,000ppm range
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Turner Designs C-sense pCO2 Sensor
2410-004
C-sense in-situ pCO2 sensor with drop-in membrane, 0-4,000ppm range
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