Vaisala INTERCAP Sensor

Vaisala INTERCAP sensors are user-replaceable components for the HMP60 humidity and temperature sensors.
Your Price $69.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Vaisala
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Vaisala INTERCAP Sensor15778HM Replacement INTERCAP sensor
$69.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Vaisala INTERCAP Sensor INTERCAPSET-10PCS Replacement INTERCAP sensor, 10 pcs
$475.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Vaisala INTERCAP Sensor
15778HM
Replacement INTERCAP sensor
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
$69.00
Vaisala INTERCAP Sensor
INTERCAPSET-10PCS
Replacement INTERCAP sensor, 10 pcs
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
$475.00
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Vaisala HMP60 Humidity and Temperature Sensor HMP60M00A0A1B0 HMP60 humidity and temperature sensor, RS-485 Modbus output
$253.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
HMP60 humidity and temperature sensor, RS-485 Modbus output
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
$253.00
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