YOUNG Wind Sensor Interface

The YOUNG 05603C wind sensor Interface provides calibrated analog DC voltage signals for wind speed and wind direction.
Your Price $480.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
YOUNG
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
YOUNG Wind Sensor Interface05603C Wind sensor interface for use with 05106, 0-5 VDC outputs
$480.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
YOUNG Wind Sensor Interface 05608C Wind sensor interface for use with 05108, 0-5 VDC outputs
$490.00
Drop ships from manufacturer
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
RM Young Cables 18446 Sensor cable, 5 conductor shielded, 22 AWG, per ft.
$0.90
Drop ships from manufacturer
  • Power Requirement: 8-24 VDC (5 mA @ 12 VDC)
  • Temperature Range: -50 to 50 C (-58 to 122 F)
  • Inputs: YOUNG Wind Monitor
  • Outputs: 0 to 5.00 VDC
  • Wind Speed: 0 to 100 M/S, Wind Direction: 0 to 360 degrees
  • Accuracy: +/-1% FS over temperature and supply voltage range.
  • Dimensions: 110 mm W x 75 mm H x 56 mm D (4.3 in W x 2.9 in H x 2.2 in D)
  • Mounting: U-bolt for vertical pipe 25-50mm (1- 2 in) Dia
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