Geotech ETL Portable Water Level Meters

The Geotech ETL level meter is designed to provide accurate and reliable measurements of groundwater levels up to 1000 feet.

Features

  • Highly accurate polyethylene coated steel well tape marked in engineering or metric increments
  • Field serviceable 5/8" probe with stainless steel conductors for durability
  • Adjustable sensitivity to prevent false triggering
Starting At $1,302.00
Stock Drop Ships From Manufacturer  

The Geotech ETL Water Level Meter is a portable instrument used to accurately measure water levels in monitoring wells. The well tape is mounted on a lightweight steel and aluminum storage reel with rugged aluminum frame. The polyethylene-coated engineer's tape is accurate to 1/100th of a foot.

The sensor consists of a stainless steel and FEP probe, and it relies on fluid conductivity to determine the presence of water. When the instrument contacts water, an audible signal and visible green light activate. The meter also features adjustable sensitivity, which is used to prevent false triggering.

Questions & Answers
What is the minimum conductivity that my water level meter can detect?
The minimum detectable conductivity is 10uS.
How long will my battery last if I keep the meter running continuously?
A 9V alkaline battery will last for up to 8 hours of continuous detecting.
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Geotech ETL Portable Water Level Meters
82050088
ETL portable meter with field replaceable 5/8" probe & imperial increments, 500'
Your Price $1,302.00
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Keck ETL 750' Portable Water Level Meter
82050089
ETL portable meter with field replaceable 5/8" probe & imperial increments, 750'
$1,763.00
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Keck ETL 1000' Portable Water Level Meter
82050090
ETL portable meter with field replaceable 5/8" probe & imperial increments, 1000'
$2,143.00
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