Lufft V200A Multi-Parameter Weather Sensor

The Lufft V200A Multi-Parameter Weather Sensor with plastic housing simultaneously measures wind speed & direction along with pressure and virtual air temperature.

Features

  • Four ultrasound sensors take cyclical measurements in all directions
  • Easily mounts to 2" diameter pipe with integrated bracket mount & nuts
  • SDI-12 output for integration with NexSens and other data loggers
Your Price $1,688.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Lufft
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Lufft V200A Multi-Parameter Weather Sensor8371.UA01 V200A multi-parameter weather sensor with plastic housing, virtual temperature, pressure & wind
$1,688.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
Lufft Ventus/V200A Sensor Interface Connector 8371.UST1 Sensor interface connector
$55.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Lufft Ventus/V200A Sensor Interface Cables 8371.UK015 Sensor interface cable with connector, 15m
$235.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Lufft Ventus/V200A Sensor Interface Cables 8371.UK050 Sensor interface cable with connector, 50m
$373.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Lufft 24V/10A Power Supply 8366.USV2 Power supply, 24V/10A
$767.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Lufft Surge Protector 8379.USP Surge protector
$317.00
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks

Overview
The Lufft family of multi-parameter weather sensors offer a cost-effective, compact alternative for the acquisition of a variety of measurement parameters on land- and buoy-based weather stations. Depending on the model, each sensor will measure a different combination of weather parameters to meet a wide variety of applications.

Pressure
Absolute air pressure is measured using a built-in MEMS sensor. The relative air pressure referenced to sea level is calculated using the barometric formula with the aid of the local altitude, which is user-configurable on the equipment.

Wind Speed & Direction
The wind sensor uses four ultrasound sensors which take cyclical measurements in all directions. The resulting wind speed and direction are calculated from the measured run-time sound differential.

Questions & Answers
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