Onset HOBO MX Carbon Dioxide/Temp/RH Data Logger

The HOBO MX1102 CO2 logger measures and records CO2 in buildings and other non-condensing environments.

Features

  • Measurement range, 0-5,000 ppm
  • Self-calibrating NDIR CO2 sensor technology
  • Access data by mobile phone, tablet or computer within 100ft of logger
Your Price $630.00
Stock Check Availability  

Onset’s HOBO MX1102 CO2 logger makes it more convenient than ever to measure and record CO2 in buildings and other noncondensing environments. It measures CO2 from 0 – 5,000 parts per million (ppm) – and our free HOBOconnect app allows you to access data right from your mobile phone or tablet within a 100-foot range.

The MX1102 also features a USB port so it can be used with a computer running HOBOware Pro graphing and analysis software.

Remotely access your data in Onset’s cloudbased HOBOlink software with the new MX Gateway.

Temperature Sensor
Range 0° to 50°C (32° to 122°F)
Accuracy ±0.21°C from 0° to 50°C (±0.38°F from 32° to 122°F)
Resolution 0.024°C at 25°C (0.04°F at 77°F)
Drift <0.1°C (0.18°F) per year
RH Sensor
Range

1% to 90% RH (non-condensing)

Accuracy ±2% from 20% to 80% typical to a maximum of ±4.5% including hysteresis at 25°C (77°F); below 20% and above 80% ±6% typical
Resolution 0.01%
Drift <1% per year typical
CO2 Sensor
Range 0 to 5,000 ppm
Accuracy

±50 ppm ±5% of reading at 25°C (77°F), less than 90% RH non-condensing and 1,013 mbar

Warm-up Time 15 seconds
Calibration Auto or manual to 400 ppm
Non-linearity <1% of FS
Pressure Dependence 0.13% of reading per mm Hg (corrected via user input for elevation/altitude)
Operating Pressure Range 950 to 1,050 mbar (use Altitude Compensation for outside of this range)
Compensated Pressure Range -305 to 5,486 m (-1,000 to 18,000 ft)
Sensing Method Non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) absorption
Response Time
Temperature 12 minutes to 90% in airflow of 1 m/s (2.2 mph)
RH 1 minute to 90% in airflow of 1 m/s (2.2 mph)
CO2 1 minute to 90% in airflow of 1 m/s (2.2 mph)
Logger
Radio Power 1 mW (0 dBm)
Transmission Range Approximately 30.5 m (100 ft) line-of-sight
Wireless Data Standard Bluetooth Smart (Bluetooth Low Energy, Bluetooth 4.0)
Logger Operating Range 0° to 50°C (32° to 122°F); 0 to 95% RH (non-condensing)
Logging Rate 1 second to 18 hours
Logging Modes Fixed interval (normal, statistics) or burst
Memory Modes Wrap when full or stop when full
Start Modes Immediate, push button, date & time, or next interval
Stop Modes When memory full, push button, date & time, or after a set logging period
Time Accuracy ± 1 minute per month at 25°C (77°F)
Power Source 4 AA 1.5 Volt batteries (user replaceable) or USB power source (5 V DC, 2 Watts) 
Battery Life 6 months, typical with logging and sampling intervals of 5 minutes or slower; 6 months or less with logging and sampling intervals faster than 5 minutes while logging CO2. Entering burst logging mode will impact battery life. With app use, battery life can be reduced by remaining connected, excessive readouts, audible alarms, and paging. Visual/audible alarms and other events can have a marginal impact on battery life.
Memory 128 KB (84,650 measurements, maximum)
Download Type USB 2.0 interface or via Bluetooth Smart
Full Memory Download Time 20 seconds via USB; approximately 60 seconds via Bluetooth Smart, may take longer the further the device is from the logger
LCD LCD is visible from 0° to 50°C (32° to 122°F); the LCD may react slowly or go blank in temperatures outside this range
Size 7.62 x 12.95 x 4.78 cm (3.0 x 5.1 x 1.88 inches)
Weight 267.4 g (9.43 oz)
Environmental Rating IP50
  • HOBO MX1102 CO2 Data Logger
  • Four AA 1.5 V alkaline batteries
Questions & Answers
No Questions
Did you find what you were looking for?

Select Options

  Products 0 Item Selected
Image
Part #
Description
Price
Stock
Quantity
Onset HOBO MX Carbon Dioxide/Temp/RH Data Logger
MX1102A
HOBO MX Carbon Dioxide/Temp/RH Data Logger
Your Price $630.00
Check Availability  
  Accessories 0 Item Selected
Notice: At least 1 product is not available to purchase online
×
Multiple Products

have been added to your cart

There are items in your cart.

Cart Subtotal: $xxx.xx

Go to Checkout

In The News

Combating Water Insecurity in Saskatchewan with Real-Time Data

The prairies of Saskatchewan can be described as one of the least water-secure parts of Canada, making water quality monitoring essential for informed resource management in a region already facing water insecurity. While natural physical properties worsen some of the poor water quality conditions in the region, others are connected to land use. Having grown up spending summers on the shores of Lake Huron, Helen Baulch, an associate professor at the School of Environment and Sustainability at the University of Saskatchewan , has always been dedicated to the protection of water resources. Looking back fondly at her childhood playing along the shore, Baulch also recalls the invasion of quagga mussels during her teenage years and watching the lake change as a result.

Read More

Seametrics Turbo Turbidity Logger: Boost your Turbidity Monitoring

The Seametrics Turbo Turbidity Logger is a self-cleaning turbidity sensor capable of internally logging over 260,000 data records. The sensor enables researchers, compliance officers, and contractors to monitor turbidity in various applications, from construction and dredging sites to wastewater effluent.  Due to its narrow width, this device can be deployed in a range of areas, from small well spaces to rivers and streams. The stainless steel housing and built-in wiper allow the sensor to withstand long-term deployments and reduce the need for maintenance trips.  The logger accurately records temperature and turbidity up to a depth of 50 meters.

Read More

Collecting Data at the Top of the World: How Scientists Retrieve Glacial Ice Cores

A helicopter touches down in the small town of Sicuani, Peru, at an elevation of 11,644 feet. Earlier that day, a boxcar brought fuel, drills, food, and other equipment for a glacial expedition. The year is 1979, and glaciologist Lonnie Thompson is preparing to lead a team to the Quelccaya ice cap in hopes of becoming the first scientists to drill an ice core sample from this glacier. The only problem? The glacier is located at 19,000 feet in one of the most remote areas of the world. The helicopter takes off from the town, but the thin atmosphere at that elevation does not allow it to safely touch down on the ice– due to the aircraft’s weight, and it becomes unstable when the air is less dense.

Read More