Onset HOBO U20L Water Level Loggers

The Onset HOBO U20L is a low-cost, research-grade water level data logger for continuously measuring water levels and temperature in various underwater environments.

Features

  • Available in 4 depth ranges
  • No-vent-tube design for easy and reliable deployment
  • Durable ceramic pressure sensor withstands freezing
$360.00
Stock More On The Way   

Overview
The Onset HOBO U20L features 0.1% measurement accuracy, a polypropylene housing for fresh and saltwater use, and a non-vented design for convenient and hassle-free deployment.

Post-Purchase Add-ons
The Onset HOBO U20L data logger requires either the U-DTW-1 Waterproof Shuttle or the Base-U-4 Base Station for configuration and data offload, HOBOware software (free download).
*NOTE: HOBOware Pro is required when using the U-DTW-1 Waterproof Shuttle.

Applications

  • Freshwater
  • Saltwater
  • Including wells
  • Streams
  • Lakes
  • Wetlands
  • Tidal areas
Questions & Answers
No Questions
Did you find what you were looking for?

Select Options

  Products 0 Item Selected
Image
Part #
Description
Price
Stock
Quantity
Onset HOBO U20L Water Level Loggers
U20L-04
HOBO U20L water level & temperature logger, 13' range
$360.00
More On The Way  
Onset HOBO U20L Water Level Loggers
U20L-01
HOBO U20L water level & temperature logger, 30' range
$360.00
More On The Way  
Onset HOBO U20L Water Level Loggers
U20L-02
HOBO U20L water level & temperature logger, 100' range
$360.00
More On The Way  
  Accessories 0 Item Selected
Notice: At least 1 product is not available to purchase online
×
Multiple Products

have been added to your cart

There are items in your cart.

Cart Subtotal: $xxx.xx

Go to Checkout

In The News

Monitoring Water Pollution in Keweenaw Bay

As much as climate change and pollution impact current generations and present environmental conditions, the compounding damages will continue to wreak havoc against generations to come if no actions are taken. This idea is central for scientists who focus their research on monitoring, analyzing and responding to environmental data. Researchers like Dylan Friisvall, the water quality technician for the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC) Natural Resources Department (NRD) , have dedicated their careers to monitoring pollution and water quality in order to protect resources for the future. “One of the best parts of my job is just being outdoors, it makes my day go by faster because I get to enjoy the fresh air, and help do my part in protecting the environment,” says Friisvall.

Read More

PME miniDOT Logger: Plunge into Data

The PME miniDOT Logger is a compact data logger that measures dissolved oxygen (DO) and temperature down to 100 meters in depth. The unit can also endure low water temperatures and is durable underneath an ice layer, which is excellent for gathering essential winter water quality data that is lacking from using less robust equipment. The high depth rating and ability to withstand frigid temperatures make the PME a reliable device that is deployable in dramatically different environments, such as a monitoring well, an inland lake or an underwater cave. The logger itself features an optical DO sensor, temperature sensor, two AA lithium batteries and a micro SD memory card.

Read More

The Water of Life: How Understanding Natural Hydrologic Processes in Aquatic Ecosystems Can Lead to a Sustainable Future

From watersheds that provide drinking water, the rain that nourishes plants, to the streams and rivers that help aquatic ecosystems flourish, water is an ever-present and ever-essential part of life. For those like Durelle Scott, a professor of Biological Systems Engineering at Virginia Tech University, understanding the importance of these natural systems was always a part of life. The desire to preserve the nation's aquatic resources stems from a childhood spent exploring the lakes and streams that surrounded him growing up in rural Pennsylvania. Now, as a teacher and a researcher, Scott makes it a priority to ensure that people now and in the future appreciate the enormous impact that aquatic ecosystems have on their lives. “I would say that water connects us all.

Read More