OTT RLS Radar Water Level Sensor

The OTT RLS, non-contact radar level sensor with pulse radar technology is ideal for monitoring in remote or hard to reach locations.

Features

  • Transmit & receive antenna enclosed in a lightweight, durable housing with flat antenna design
  • Easily mounts to a bridge, frame, pipeline, or extension arm
  • Connects to NexSens X2 data logging system via SDI-12 interface
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ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
OTT RLS Radar Water Level Sensor6310900192S RLS radar water level sensor, FCC Version (25 GHz), SDI-12 & 4-20mA output
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Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
OTT RLS Radar Water Level Sensor
6310900192S
RLS radar water level sensor, FCC Version (25 GHz), SDI-12 & 4-20mA output
Usually ships in 1-2 weeks
Check Price
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
NexSens 8 Conductor PVC Cable C8P-24-P 8 conductor 24 AWG cable, PVC jacket, priced per ft.
$3.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
NexSens UW-FL3 Flying Lead Cable Assembly UW-FL3 UW plug to flying lead cable, 3m
$145.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
8 conductor 24 AWG cable, PVC jacket, priced per ft.
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$3.00
NexSens UW-FL3 Flying Lead Cable Assembly
UW-FL3
UW plug to flying lead cable, 3m
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$145.00

The RLS non-contact radar level sensor with pulse radar technology is ideal for monitoring in remote areas and applications where conventional measuring systems are not suitable. The RLS accurately and efficiently measures surface water level With a non-contact distance range of up to 115 feet above water. The sensor is IP67 waterproof and has extremely low power consumption, making it ideal for solar-charged monitoring systems.

The radar level sensor uses a revolutionary level measurement technology, meeting the USGS accuracy requirement of +/-0.01 feet. Two antennas are enclosed in a compact housing and transmit pulses toward the water surface. The time delay from transmission to receipt is proportional to the distance between sensor and water surface. A sampling rate of 16 Hz (16 measurements/second) with 20 second averaging minimizes water surface conditions such as waves and turbulence. The RLS does not require calibration and is unaffected by air temperature, humidity, flood events, floating debris, or contaminated water.

  • (1) Radar level sensor
  • (1) 2-part swivel mount
  • (1) Installation kit - Includes (4) 6x40mm wood screws & (4) plastic plugs
  • (2) Double open-ended wrenches (10x13)
  • (1) Factory acceptance test certificate (FAT)
  • (1) Operations manual
Questions & Answers
Does the sensor have to be connected to a data logger?

Yes, the sensor does not have logging capabilities and needs to be integrated with a data logger. Sensor output options are SDI-12, SDI-12 via RS-485 and 4-20mA.

What is the difference between radar and ultrasonic sensing technologies?

While ultrasonic sensors emit high frequency (20 kHz to 200 kHz) acoustic waves, radar sensors use radio-frequency signals (1GHz to 60 GHz) and readings are generally less affected by pressure, temperature and moisture changes.

How is the level sensor installed?

The radar level sensor is mounted to a structure so that the radar beam is perpendicular to the surface of the water. A guide for installation and site selection can be found here: https://www.fondriest.com/pdf/ott_rls_install.pdf

Please, mind that only logged in users can submit questions

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