RainWise Tripod Mount

The 3-foot galvanized steel tripod provides a solid mount for the MK-III weather station and can be used on both flat and pitched roofs.

Features

  • All heavy 5/16" bolted construction
  • Accepts up to 2-1/4" mast
  • Easy to tilt and service
Your Price $59.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
RainWise
Free Lifetime Tech SupportFree Lifetime Tech Support
ImagePart#Product DescriptionPriceStockOrder
RainWise Tripod Mount811-1004 Tripod mount, 3 ft.
$59.00
Usually ships in 3-5 days
RainWise Tripod Mount
811-1004
Tripod mount, 3 ft.
Usually ships in 3-5 days
$59.00
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